Water Events

Podcast

Global Water Security: The Intelligence Community Assessment

May 09, 2012 // 3:00pm5:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
Panelists from the Department of State, National Intelligence Council, Stimson Center, and National Geographic came together at the Wilson Center recently to discuss the U.S. intelligence community’s global water security assessment.
Peg Brady speaks about invasive species
Webcast

Uninvited Guests: Invasive Alien Species and the Threat to Ecosystems and Economies

May 08, 2012 // 9:00am11:00am
Canada Institute
Experts agree that ongoing trade, habitat destruction, and climate change will exacerbate the threat posed by invasive alien species throughout Canada and the United States. The invasive species threat has immediate and long-term implications for the ecology, biodiversity, economic prosperity, human health, and national security of both countries.
Webcast

Nigeria Beyond the Headlines: Population, Health, Natural Resources, and Governance

April 25, 2012 // 8:30am5:30pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
Media coverage and policy debates outside Nigeria rarely go beyond covering the latest crisis. This conference goes beyond the headlines to better understand key challenges and opportunities.
Alberta Waterfall

Emerging Scarcity in a Land of Plenty: Water and Water Policy in Canada

April 17, 2012 // 9:00am11:00am
Canada Institute
Canada is a state blessed with the world’s largest supplies of fresh water. While other natural resources (oil, grain, timber) figure largely in Canada’s economic and international profile, water is rapidly becoming recognized as a core of these other resource-based industries, and a resource that is increasingly challenged both in terms of supply and quality.
Duke, Arctic

Who “Owns” The Arctic?: An International and Interdisciplinary Conference [Chapel Hill, NC]

March 28, 2012 // 1:45pm6:45pm
Canada Institute
The Wilson Center’s Canada Institute and Kennan Institute, with the Center for Canadian Studies at Duke University, joined UNC Chapel Hill’s Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies (CSEEES) to host Who “Owns” The Arctic?: An International and Interdisciplinary Conference on March 28, 2012 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The conference brought together policymakers, academics, students, and environmentalists to explore diverse issues related to Arctic resource and energy management from Russian, Canadian, American, and other perspectives.

China’s Water Watchdogs

March 20, 2012 // 9:00am11:00am
China Environment Forum
China is home to some of the most polluted rivers and lakes in the world. Through stricter water pollution control laws and new targets in the 12th Five-Year Plan, the Chinese government has intensified pressure on cities and industries to curb water pollution and wastage. Enforcement of such top-down initiatives remains challenging, but the Chinese environmental NGO community has been pursuing a broader range of tactics to improve water protection efforts—ranging from increasing transparency and information disclosure and conducting third party audits, to public interest law cases and public education campaigns. At this March 20th CEF meeting, Kristen McDonald from Pacific Environment will introduce the diverse and increasingly effective strategies being used by Chinese NGOs in to protect water and communities from pollution. Then Susan Keane from NRDC will discuss NRDC’s innovative Clean by Design program, which is designed to use the buying power of multinational apparel retailers and brands as a lever to reduce the environmental impacts of their suppliers abroad.

Environmental Film Festival: Transcending Boundaries

March 14, 2012 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
The Environmental Film Festival comes to the Wilson Center to highlight the work of International Peace Park Expeditions. Join Saleem Ali, Professor of Environmental Studies, University of Vermont; Todd Walters, Founder, Executive Director, International Peace Park Expeditions and filmmaker Cory Wilson as they discuss Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park and transboundary conservation in the Central Albertine Rift Valley.
Webcast

Hotspots: Population Growth in Areas of High Biodiversity

February 29, 2012 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
Biologists have identified 35 areas, called biodiversity hotspots, which are especially rich in endemic species but threatened by human activities. Can addressing population growth in these areas help conserve threatened species and improve community health?

2012 National Council for Science and Environment Conference on Environment and Security [Ronald Reagan Building]

January 18, 2012 // 8:00amJanuary 20, 2012 // 2:15pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
The environment impacts human health in many ways - through air and water quality; providing vectors for infectious diseases; and exposure to toxics used for many purposes, including (ironically) for increasing the safety of food and water. These are just a few. Changing environmental conditions lead to changing health threats. Health threats on a large scale can quickly become security issues as populations begin to move or as nations erect barriers to real or perceived external threats. Large scale health threats can arise from large scale environmental changes, from new pandemics with environmental vectors, or in stressed communities with limited health services.

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