Past Events

North Korean War Orphans in Transnational Educational Exchange

August 27, 2014 // 2:00pm3:00pm
North Korea International Documentation Project
More than 100,000 children from both North and South Korea were orphaned during the Korean War. In 1953, the North Korean government dispatched 1,200 orphans to the People’s Republic of Poland to be educated at a boarding school transformed into an orphanage. The orphans were repatriated after six years, at the insistence of the North Korean government, as tensions between Pyongyang and its communist allies began to emerge. NKIDP Intern Intaek Hong examines the complicated process of how the orphans defined their identity based on their experience of interacting with their Polish teachers—who became like foster parents—and deploying their subjectivity in the process.

Mapping the Cost of Non-Europe

August 26, 2014 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Global Europe Program
What should the European Union’s policy priorities be in the coming institutional cycle? How can the economic benefits of the European Union be determined? The Global Europe Program brings together experts from the European Parliament to present one of its most recent studies. ‘Mapping the Cost of Non-Europe, 2014-19,’ illustrates the work-in-progress results of a long-term project to identify and analyze the ‘cost of non-Europe’ in a number of policy fields. This concept is used to quantify the potential efficiency gained in today’s European economy by pursuing a given set of policy initiatives – from a wider and deeper digital single market and an integrated energy market to a genuine common defense policy.

Turkey, Iraq, and the Kurdistan Regional Government

August 25, 2014 // 2:00pm4:00pm
Global Europe Program
The advances of ISIS have reheated the debate on the future of Iraq. The country is threatened by a new wave of violence and destruction, as a large swath of territory has turned into a conflict zone and an uprising has shaken the political order. Turkey has both opportunities and challenges in Iraq, and keeps a close eye on the situation there. In this discussion, experts will address the future of Iraq and the KRG in the context of the current crisis, and will shed light on Turkey’s perspectives on the KRG, energy issues, minorities, and Iraq in general.
Webcast

Preempting Environmental and Human Security Crises in Africa: Science-Based Planning for Climate Variability Threats

August 20, 2014 // 10:00am1:00pm
Africa Program
Development and poverty reduction are inextricably linked to the water, energy and security nexus in Africa. There was some consensus that the impact of climate variability and extreme climate events depends not only on the severity of the crisis, but also on the vulnerability of the affected population – which is correlated with the level of development along with governance and other socio-cultural factors. Just as poverty can put communities at an increased level of vulnerability, so can sustainable development lead to improvements in climate-resilience and human security.

Symbolic Nation-Building in Croatia from the Homeland War to EU Membership

August 19, 2014 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Global Europe Program
Drawing on a recently published larger volume - Strategies of Symbolic Nation-Building in Southeast Europe – Vjeran Pavlakovic will analyze the nation and state building strategies of the Croatian elite since the country attained independence, following the Homeland War, 1991-1995. In his presentation, Pavlakovic will focus on the role of contested narratives and commemorative practices related to the wars of the 20th century in the political arena. The discussion will also address current attitudes and sentiments in Croatia towards the EU, following the country’s accession to the European Union in July, 2013.

"They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else: A History of the Armenian Genocide"

August 14, 2014 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Kennan Institute
Starting in early 1915, the Ottoman Turks began deporting and killing hundreds of thousands of Armenians in the first major genocide of the twentieth century. By the end of the First World War, the number of Armenians in what would become Turkey had been reduced by ninety percent—more than a million people. A century later, the Armenian Genocide remains controversial but relatively unknown, overshadowed by later slaughters and the chasm separating Turkish and Armenian versions of events. In this definitive narrative history, Ronald Suny cuts through nationalist myths, propaganda, and denial to provide an unmatched account of when, how, and why the atrocities of 1915–1916 were committed.
Podcast

Teleconference: Can Iraq Be Saved? The US, ISIS and Iraqi Political Reconciliation

August 13, 2014 // 10:00am11:00am
Middle East Program
The situation in Iraq is as complicated as it is grim. ISIS continues to surge as the US tries to contain its gains through military strikes and direct military assistance to the Kurds. Meanwhile Baghdad boils as a new Prime Minister-designate faces off against an old one who refuses to give way. What are the prospects for checking ISIS and for political reconciliation in Iraq?
Webcast

Laying the BRICS of a New Global Order: From Yekaterinburg 2009 to eThekwini 2013

August 12, 2014 // 2:00pm3:30pm
Africa Program
The meteoric rise of the BRICS group has led to an unprecedented increase in partnership, trade, and investment among some of the world’s most dynamic economies. Yet this increase in cooperation should not be allowed to obscure the complexities and contradictions inherent within this cohort of emerging global actors.
Podcast

Teleconference: Gaza Conflict Resumes After Ceasefire Ends

August 11, 2014 // 10:00am11:00am
Middle East Program
The breakdown in the 72-hour Egyptian-brokered ceasefire and the resumption of the conflict between Israel and Hamas threatens to take the Gaza crisis to a new level. What are the prospects for escalation and/or for negotiations to de-escalate the situation? Can the requirements of the parties somehow be reconciled? What is the role of the Palestinian Authority and Egypt going forward? And what is the American role?

Privacy Vs Democracy: The Challenge for Japan and Australia

August 06, 2014 // 4:00pm5:00pm
Asia Program
Protecting privacy is as critical as information sharing. In a democracy, protecting information goes hand in hand with ensuring individual liberty, and the rapid development of digital technology has made the protection of privacy even more important.

Pages

To Attend an Event

Unless otherwise noted:

Meetings listed on this page are free and open to the public. Reservations are not required unless otherwise noted. All meetings take place at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, DC. Please see map and directions. Allow time for routine security procedures. A photo ID is required for entry.

To confirm time and place, contact Maria-Stella Gatzoulis on the day of the event: tel. (202) 691-4188. Check this page for the latest updates and notices.