Past Events

Ending Dictatorship: Options for the International Community

September 09, 2003 // 9:00am11:00am
Project on Leadership and Building State Capacity
VENUE: Kenney Auditorium, School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Ambassador Mark Palmer, Vice Chairman, Freedom House; Nina Bang-Jensen, Executive Director/Counsel, Coalition for International Justice; and Thomas Hill, Center for International Conflict Resolution, Columbia University

VIDEO CONFERENCE of Human Security and Dignity: Fulfilling the Promise of the United Nations

September 08, 2003 // 9:45am12:30pm
Project on Leadership and Building State Capacity
Speeches by Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Former Brazilian President; Kofi Annan, Secretary-General; Jan Kavan, General Assembly President and Shashi Tharoor, Under-Secretary-General for Communications and Public Information.

Cold War Memory: Interpreting the Physical Legacy of the Cold War

September 08, 2003 // 9:00am6:00pm
Cold War International History Project
On September 8 and 9, 2003, the Woodrow Wilson Center's Cold War International History Project hosted a pioneering international conference on Cold War commemorative efforts. The meeting was co-sponsored by the Association of Air Force Missileers, the Cold War Museum, the German Historical Institute (Washington, DC), the Harry S. Truman Library, the Kennan Institute; in cooperation with the Norwegian Aviation Museum, the Eisenhower Foundation and Eisenhower Presidential Library, and the National Coalition for History; and with generous financial support from the Boeing Company and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Sudan: Last Steps in the Peace Process

September 03, 2003 // 2:00pm3:30pm
Africa Program
Presentation on The Sudan: Last Steps in the Peace Process, with perspectives from the government of Sudan, represented by Ambassador Khidir H. Ahmed; the Sudan People's Liberation Movement/Army, represented by Steven Wondu; and the International Crisis Group, represented by John Prendergast, who just returned from Khartoum and Nairobi.The Sudan peace process has reached a critical juncture. Both parties and the international community are facing difficult choices, with the threat of a return to war and an escalation of pressure by the U.S. Congress looming in the background. The speakers explored the dynamics of the peace process as well as the regional and international context in which it is situated.The session will be moderated by Dr. Howard Wolpe, Director of the Africa Project at the Woodrow Wilson Center.

Book Launch: Rivers for Life: Managing Water for People and Nature

September 03, 2003 // 10:00am12:00pm
Environmental Change and Security Program
Authors of the new book Rivers for Life discuss how the disruption of natural river flows by large dams and river diversions is causing a worldwide crisis in river health and the loss of valuable ecosystem services.

The Impact of U.S. Border Security on Transborder Cooperation with Mexico

August 21, 2003 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Mexico Institute
A seminar with José María Ramos,Professor of Public Administration, El Colegio de la Frontera Norte (Tijuana) & Woodrow Wilson Center and Comexi Public Policy Scholar and John Bailey, Professor of Government and Director of the Mexico Project at Georgetown University

Urban Think Tank Launch

August 20, 2003 // 8:30am5:00pm
Urban Sustainability Laboratory

Race and Social Inequality

August 13, 2003 // 12:00am
Brazil Institute
There are striking similarities between race relations in the United States and Brazil. Recently there has been a great deal of attention paid to this subject in both countries, and it deserves to be studied and analyzed from all perspectives.

Luncheon: Presentations of Africanist Doctoral Candidate Fellowship Recipients

August 04, 2003 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Africa Program
Presentation by the Africa Project’s two current Africanist Doctoral Candidate Fellows: J. Tyler Dickovick, Ph.D. candidate at Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School and D. Grace Davie, Ph.D. candidate at the University of Michigan.

CUSP Workshop: Decentralization and Local Government in Urban West Africa

August 04, 2003 // 9:00am6:00pm
Urban Sustainability Laboratory
Africa, one of the least urbanized continents of the world, is urbanizing rapidly. Thus, in the year 2000 Africa's total population (estimated at 794 million) was 37.2 percent urbanized – the lowest of any major continental region of the world. During the next thirty years, however, the United Nations projects an annual average growth rate for Africa at 3.27 percent, the highest in the world by a substantial margin. The twin trends of decentralization and democratization have affected much of West Africa. The workshop will address potential ideas and approaches to an upcoming urban forum, which the Comparative Urban Studies Project is organizing for December, 2003, also in Dakar. Among the topics for discussion are the current urbanization experience in West African (anglophone and francophone) countries; new approaches to urban governance and urban policy research in comparative perspective; the experience of decentralization; and experiences with municipal governance and democracy in the West African – and wider African – region. The workshop itself will be a closed meeting of approximately fifteen participants from a variety of different backgrounds.

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To Attend an Event

Unless otherwise noted:

Meetings listed on this page are free and open to the public. Reservations are not required unless otherwise noted. All meetings take place at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, DC. Please see map and directions. Allow time for routine security procedures. A photo ID is required for entry.

To confirm time and place, contact Maria-Stella Gatzoulis on the day of the event: tel. (202) 691-4188. Check this page for the latest updates and notices.