Democratic Transition News

Turmoil in Tunisia Two Years Later

Jan 16, 2013
The second anniversary of Tunisia’s Jasmine Revolution reflected the deepening political divisions across the North African country. Five different political factions—two Islamist and three secular parties—took to the street of Tunis on January 14 to mark the ouster of former President Zine al Abidine Ben Ali. They had starkly different messages.

Egypt: Interview with Mohamed Morsi

Jan 14, 2013
In an interview with CNN, Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi called for Syrian President Bashar Assad to be tried for war crimes at the International Criminal Court. Morsi also pledged to respect Egypt’s treaty with Israel while supporting Palestinian efforts to attain “their full-fledged rights.” He outlined his new attempt to reconcile Hamas and Fatah, the two dominant Palestinian parties that have split up the West Bank and Gaza since factional fighting in 2007.

In 2013, Rise of the Right in Elections Across the Mideast

Jan 03, 2013
In 2013, millions of Israelis, Iranians, and Arabs will vote in at least 10 pivotal elections that will, in turn, address basic issues facing the Middle East. These countries have vast political, religious, ethnic, and economic differences. But most confront a common trend—the rise of the right or the religious right—that will influence elections as well as policies both at home and in the broader region.

Latin American Program in the News: Latin America 2013: Political Outlook

Jan 03, 2013
Trouble in Argentina and Venezuela and elections in Chile, Ecuador, Honduras and Paraguay.

English Translation of the Tunisian Draft Constitution

Jan 03, 2013
The Tunisian National Constituent Assembly issued a draft constitution on Dec. 14, 2012. Civil society representatives in six of Tunisia's 24 governorates met with assembly members to discuss the text later that month. The National Constituent Assembly launched the initiative with the United Nations to "enhance citizens' participation in the debate." The following is a non-official English translation of the draft constitution by the United Nations Development Programme project in Tunisia.

An Ideal Constitution on Women’s Rights

Jan 02, 2013
Women from across the Middle East — from Morocco to Jordan, Egypt to Iraq — responded to the following question: What would an ideal constitution say on women’s rights?

European Studies Short-term and Summer Research Grant Competitions

Jan 02, 2013
European Studies is now accepting applications for two of its research grants - the short-term research grant and the summer research grant. Both stipends are available to American academic experts and practitioners, including advanced graduate students, engaged in specialized research requiring access to Washington, DC and its research institutions. Grants are for one and two months respectively, and include residence at the Wilson Center. Candidates must be U.S. citizens, in order to be considered eligible for this grant opportunity. The deadline for applying for both grans is March 1, 2013.

U.S. Urges Morsi to Bridge Political Divisions

Jan 01, 2013
On December 25, the U.S. State Department urged Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi to “bridge divisions, build trust, and broaden support for the political process.” The Christmas Day statement came three days after the draft constitution passed in a public referendum by 63.8 percent, but with only 32.9 percent voter turnout.

Aung San Suu Kyi to be Honored with 2012 Ion Ratiu Democracy Award

Dec 20, 2012
Aung San Suu Kyi will receive the 2012 Ion Ratiu Democracy Award, Jane Harman, president and director of the Wilson Center, announced today. Suu Kyi, will be honored with the prestigious award at a symposium in Yangon, co-hosted by the Wilson Center’s Global Women’s Leadership Initiative on January 15-16, 2013.

Middle East in 2013: Promise and (Lots of) Peril

Dec 18, 2012
The Middle East faces even bigger challenges in 2013 than it did during the first two years of the so-called Arab Spring. So far—a pivotal caveat—the Arab uprisings have deepened the political divide, worsened economic woes and produced greater insecurity. Solutions are not imminent either.

Pages