Global Governance News

Roger-Mark De Souza on Resilience and the UN Climate Talks

Jul 01, 2015
Roger-Mark De Souza was quoted alongside UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and Robert Redford in an Inter-Press Service article on this year's climate talks in Paris. IPS turned to De Souza to learn more about how resilience should factor into the negotiations.

Still Cozy After All These Years

Jun 25, 2015
"Sixty-five years after the Korean War, North Korea is more to Beijing than just a security buffer and an economic appendage of China’s insatiable economy. It is the battleground where China took on mighty America and wrestled it to a stalemate. Yes, at high cost, but according to the party, in the service of just causes: China’s greatness and the longevity of the CCP," write Masuda Hajimu and Sergey Radchenko.
Webcast

The Obama-Rousseff Meeting: What’s on the Agenda?

Jun 24, 2015
Given the current recession and political climate in Brazil, President Rousseff's upcoming visit to the United States could lay the groundwork for restored prosperity in both its economy and relationship with the United States. In this episode of TRENDING, Brazil Institute Director Paulo Sotero provides an overview of Rousseff's objectives and discusses the potential effects of the meeting on both countries as well as the global community.

A False War Fades: The End of Brazil-Mexico Rivalry?

Jun 10, 2015
Paulo Sotero and Duncan Wood, directors of the Brazil Institute and Mexico Institute, write for the Financial Times Beyond Brics Blog on the bilateral relationship between the two countries.

Are Ukraine and the U.S. Allies or Not?

Jun 10, 2015
"At this critical moment for the future of Ukrainian, European and U.S. interests in the region, the U.S.-Ukraine strategic partnership lacks both strategy and partnership," write Matthew Rojansky, Thomas Graham and Michael Kofman.

In Public Perceptions and Congress, a Disconnect on Trade?

Jun 01, 2015
"Fifty-nine percent of liberal Democrats and 62 percent of independents believe previous free-trade agreements have been good for the U.S., compared with just 50 percent of conservative Republicans. But you wouldn’t know that by studying the House, where more than 150 Democrats have announced opposition to TPP as well as presidential “fast track” authority for future trade deals. Republican opposition to the trade deal casts further doubt about its future," writes Linda Killian.

How Supplying Sunni Tribes Could Backfire on the U.S.

May 30, 2015
"If the U.S. opens an assistance conduit to the tribes, it could have major consequences among Shiites: It could weaken Mr. Abadi in the eyes of his Shiite constituency; it could undermine the premise of central government the U.S. is trying to support; it could even lead Iran to more aggressively push their Shiite militias in Iraq, further weakening the idea of centralized authority," writes Aaron David Miller.
Webcast

U.S. China Policy: Accommodate or Double Down?

May 27, 2015
Two recent reports have triggered a discussion surrounding the evolution of US policy toward China. The fundamental choice confronting policymakers is whether to respond to China’s rise by accommodating its ambitions or to challenge the People’s Republic by attempting to reassert or double down on American preeminence in the Asia-Pacific region. Kissinger Institute Director Robert Daly explains the options during this edition of Wilson Center NOW.

A Warning in Iran’s Closed-Door Trial of Reporter Jason Rezaian

May 26, 2015
"The ministry, aided by a pliant judiciary, may be trying to make an example of Mr. Rezaian. His experience serves as a warning to other Iranians or dual nationals who work for foreign news agencies in Iran or universities and think tanks abroad. The message? Such Iranians should not feel free, or safe, to travel between Iran and the U.S. or Europe," writes Haleh Esfandiari

Will Putin Gamble All On A Broader Ukraine Invasion?

May 25, 2015
"The incursion in Ukraine is modest compared with that of Afghanistan, and the number of Russian deaths is far smaller. Yet once again a limited number of Kremlin leaders, without benefit of public debate, may make a fateful decision about using force against a neighbor. The leaders should bear in mind the lesson of Afghanistan and exercise caution," write Denis Corboy, William Courtney, and Kenneth Yalowitz.

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