Race and Ethnicity News

Westminister Church Washington DC

Making Community Work: the Importance of the Performing Arts

Nov 12, 2014
Resilience and adaptability increasingly are seen as essential for community well-being, particularly in the face of growing challenges and dilemmas posed by natural and man-made misfortune. Resilience, in turn, requires expansive social capital and vibrant civic life. Community vitality requires increasingly diverse neighbors come to know one another, even if only casually. As these Washington examples demonstrate, the shared enjoyment provided by the performing arts promotes a virtuous cycle which enables communities to move forward in the face of adversity.

Why Kobani Matters

Oct 09, 2014
"Thundering air power can be daunting, but sometimes the effect is more psychological than physical. Big costly bombs fired by big costly warplanes have been knocking a fair number of “armed vehicles,” which may be little more than a pick-up truck with a weapon mounted on the back. But they have not yet set back the ISIS campaign in Syria," writes Robin Wright.

How Modi’s Evolution From Pariah to Pop Star Could Boost U.S.-India Ties

Oct 01, 2014
"There is something distinctly American about Mr. Modi. His rise from a tea-seller’s son to high office through hard work and a strong embrace of the free market is reminiscent of a Horatio Alger rags-to-riches tale. Additionally, Mr. Modi’s courtship of the Indian diaspora and U.S. business is freighted with positive implications for bilateral ties," says Michael Kugelman.

Performance and Power from Kabuki to Go Go

Sep 30, 2014
"Emerging during periods of profound economic change, these art forms (kabuki and Go Go) were products of the social vacuum left by conflicts over power. They expressed the frustrations and struggles of social groups that were on the losing end of those skirmishes; and they did so in ways that were unvarnished and potent," writes Blair Ruble.

Diversity by Design

Feb 07, 2014
Arlington, VA and Markham Ontario aren’t just ‘celebrating’ diversity, they’re using policy to plan it.

Angela Kocze to Receive the 2013 Ion Ratiu Democracy Award

Oct 21, 2013
Angela Kocze, a leading Hungarian Roma rights activist and scholar, is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor with the Department of Sociology at Wake Forest University in North Carolina, as well as a Research Fellow at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

Why Promoting Tolerance and Inclusion in Europe is in the U.S. Interest

Aug 05, 2013
“Why Promoting Tolerance and Inclusion in Europe is in the U.S. Interest,” a Wilson Center policy brief by former Public Policy Scholar Spencer P. Boyer, demonstrates the relevance of diversity politics in Europe and its importance to the transatlantic relationship.

Current Immigration and Integration Debates in Germany and the United States: What We Can Learn from Each Other

Aug 05, 2013
Former Public Policy Scholar Spencer P. Boyer compares immigration and integration debates in Germany and the United States in a policy paper co-authored with Victoria Pardini.

East European Studies Short-term Research Scholarships

Jun 07, 2013
The Wilson Center's Global Europe Program is now accepting applications for the EES Short-term Grant competition, which is open to academic experts and practitioners, including advanced graduate students, engaged in specialized research requiring access to Washington, DC and its research institutions. Grants are for one month and include residence at the Wilson Center. Candidates must be U.S. citizens, in order to be considered eligible for this grant opportunity. The deadline for this grant cycle is: September 1, 2013.

Pew: U.S. Attitudes on Islam Post-Boston

May 07, 2013
The Boston Marathon bombings do not appear to have changed the public’s view of Islam. In a notable poll, about 42 percent of Americans say Islam is more likely to encourage violence than other religions, while 46 percent say Islam does not. Opinions reflected in the new survey are similar to those found in others from the past decade. But in March 2002 ― just six months after the 9/11 attacks ― only a quarter of respondents said Islam was more likely to encourage violence.

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