Security and Defense News

Is the Petraeus Scandal about National Security?

Nov 15, 2012
Jane Harman talks to CNN's Wolf Blitzer about the departure of David Petraeus as CIA Director.

Former Interim Prime Minister of Libya Mahmoud Jibril at the Wilson Center

Nov 09, 2012
Jane Harman, Director, President, and CEO at the Wilson Center, in a discussion with Mahmoud Jibril, Former Interim Prime Minister of Libya and Head of the National Forces Alliance.

Israeli Security: Has it Changed in the Wake of the Arab Spring?

Nov 07, 2012
Efraim Halevy, former Director of Mossad and one of Israel’s most preeminent strategic thinkers, provides his perspective on how sweeping changes throughout the region may be altering the security scenario for Israel and its allies.

Negotiating With Iran Part 1: Switzerland's Protecting Power Mandate

Nov 06, 2012
Iran's nuclear program continues to move forward. Israel and the United States have declared a nuclear Iran unacceptable. Negotiations have stalled while sanctions appear to be taking a toll on the Islamic Republic's economy. How will the standoff be resolved? Is a diplomatic solution possible or is a military confrontation inevitable? To gain insight into the possibility for diplomacy to prevail, we spoke with two veteran Iran experts with decades of direct experience in the diplomatic arena. First up is the Swiss Ambassador to the Islamic Republic. Because of Switzerland's role as "protective power" of the U.S. in Iran, Livia Leu Agosti has served as the diplomatic liaison between the countries since 2009.

Negotiating With Iran Part 2: A Matter of Trust

Nov 06, 2012
Iran's nuclear program continues to move forward. Israel and the United States have declared a nuclear Iran unacceptable. Negotiations have stalled while sanctions appear to be taking a toll on the Islamic Republic's economy. How will the standoff be resolved? Is a diplomatic solution possible or is a military confrontation inevitable? To gain insight into the possibility for diplomacy to prevail, we spoke with two veteran Iran experts with decades of direct experience in the diplomatic arena. John Limbert, one of the 52 Americans held hostage for 444 days from November 4, 1979, to January 20, 1981, shares his unique perspective on U.S.-Iran relations.

On The Brink Part 5: The Cuban Missile Crisis 50 Years Later

Oct 26, 2012
In the latest chapter of our "On The Brink" series, we explore the meaning and relevance of the term, "nuclear order of battle" with Robert S. Norris from the Federation of American Scientists. If the worst had happened, how would escalation have occured? Norris' research is the first that attempts to answer this question.

Interview between Efraim Halevy and Aaron David Miller

Oct 24, 2012
Efraim Halevy is a former Director of Mossad and former Head of the Israeli National Security Council. Aaron David Miller is the Vice President for New Initiatives at the Woodrow Wilson Center. The interview took place following the October 18 meeting “Iran, Palestine, and the Arab Spring: The View from Israel” at the Wilson Center.

Pew: U.S. Voter Pessimism on New Middle East

Oct 22, 2012
The Pew Research Center conducted a poll on the U.S. public‘s views on the Middle East in early October. The public is increasingly pessimistic about regional developments following the Arab uprisings. In April 2011, 42 percent of Americans thought changes in leadership would “lead to lasting improvements for people” in countries like Egypt and Libya. But in October 2012, only 25 percent still believe there will be lasting improvements.The results were released prior to the final presidential debate between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. Overall the poll found little difference in opinion between Republicans, Democrats and Independents. The majority of Americans, 54 percent, say it is “more important to have stable governments in the Middle East, even if there is less democracy in the region.”

Regulating the Resource Curse

Oct 15, 2012
This summer, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission adopted new regulations requiring oil, gas, and mineral companies listed on U.S. stock exchanges to report payments to foreign governments. The aim of the effort is to reduce the kind of corruption and insecurity seen in places like Angola, Nigeria, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo – sometimes called the “resource curse.” But, argues Wilson Center scholar Jeff Colgan, it may also help reduce international conflict between more developed countries as well.

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