U.S. Foreign Policy News

American Perceptions of US Embassy Attacks

Oct 16, 2012
Following the massive Arab and Muslim demonstrations and attacks on American embassies in Libya and Egypt in reaction to an anti-Muslim video, the Sadat Chair for Peace and Development at the University of Maryland and the Program on International Policy attitudes conducted an American public opinion poll to study how the American public reacted to these events. A majority of Americans said the attacks were supported by extremist minorities but also thought the Egyptian and Libyan governments did not protect American diplomats and their staff. About three in ten Americans wanted to completely cut aid to Egypt and four in ten wanted to reduce aid.

Clinton Pledges Increased Support for Democratic Transitions

Oct 16, 2012
On October 12, Secretary of State Hilary Clinton declared that U.S. support for democratic transitions is a “strategic necessity” and not just “a matter of idealism.” She discussed the status of North African political transitions at a conference hosted by the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Clinton pledged to increase engagement with the region, despite the outbreak of anti-American sentiment in September 2012. She urged Congress to approve an additional $770 million in assistance to countries that enact political and economic reforms.

Regulating the Resource Curse

Oct 15, 2012
This summer, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission adopted new regulations requiring oil, gas, and mineral companies listed on U.S. stock exchanges to report payments to foreign governments. The aim of the effort is to reduce the kind of corruption and insecurity seen in places like Angola, Nigeria, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo – sometimes called the “resource curse.” But, argues Wilson Center scholar Jeff Colgan, it may also help reduce international conflict between more developed countries as well.

What Should the Next American President Do About China?

Oct 10, 2012
BBC Radio’s Robin Lustig moderated a debate with Elizabeth Economy, Chas W. Freeman, Jr., J. Stapleton Roy, and Yan Xuetong. This debate, the third in a three-part series sponsored by the Carnegie Endowment, was structured around three broad questions on how the next U.S. president ought to engage China.

Gallup: U.S. Approval Down Across the Region

Sep 24, 2012
On Sept. 24, Gallup released a poll showing that U.S. approval in the Middle East was already waning before the “Innocence of Muslims” film provoked widespread anti-U.S. demonstrations. The organization surveyed 12 countries between January and May 2012. All together about 20 percent of adults approved of the U.S. leadership’s “job performance.”

Initial Report of U.S.-China Security Perceptions Project Released

Sep 20, 2012
This project emerged from an awareness of the growing influence, in both the United States and especially China, of both public and elite attitudes on what many analysts recognize as the increasingly turbulent bilateral security relationship. Its objective is to obtain non-partisan policy-relevant data and insights on the evolving content and influence of such attitudes, as policymakers seek to reduce the likelihood of serious future bilateral crises or conflicts.

How 9/11 Changed How Americans View The World

Sep 11, 2012
After the terror attacks on 9/11, a public opinion survey by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs showed widespread support for increased spending on national security and counterterrorism. A decade later, a new survey shows that "Americans have become increasingly selective about how and where to engage in the world." Jane Harman and Robert Kagan of the Brookings Institution, spoke with listeners about the results of the 2012 survey on NPR's Talk of the Nation.

Latin American Program in the News: Protecting Julian Assange: What’s in it for Ecuador?

Aug 24, 2012
Director Cynthia J. Arnson discusses why she thinks Rafael Correa has been so protective of Assange.

Don’t Fear All Islamists, Fear Salafis

Aug 21, 2012
Not all Islamist political parties are to be feared, but an extremist strain called the Salafis have a warped vision of a new order in the Middle East, writes Robin Wright in The New York Times.

Pakistan's Hidden Threat

Aug 08, 2012
The Haqqani network and other violent militant groups are not the only things we should be worried about in Pakistan, argues South Asia associate Michael Kugelman in a New York Times op-ed about an Islamist organization called Hizb-ut-Tahrir.

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