U.S. Politics News

Pew: U.S. Voter Pessimism on New Middle East

Oct 22, 2012
The Pew Research Center conducted a poll on the U.S. public‘s views on the Middle East in early October. The public is increasingly pessimistic about regional developments following the Arab uprisings. In April 2011, 42 percent of Americans thought changes in leadership would “lead to lasting improvements for people” in countries like Egypt and Libya. But in October 2012, only 25 percent still believe there will be lasting improvements.The results were released prior to the final presidential debate between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. Overall the poll found little difference in opinion between Republicans, Democrats and Independents. The majority of Americans, 54 percent, say it is “more important to have stable governments in the Middle East, even if there is less democracy in the region.”

Regulating the Resource Curse

Oct 15, 2012
This summer, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission adopted new regulations requiring oil, gas, and mineral companies listed on U.S. stock exchanges to report payments to foreign governments. The aim of the effort is to reduce the kind of corruption and insecurity seen in places like Angola, Nigeria, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo – sometimes called the “resource curse.” But, argues Wilson Center scholar Jeff Colgan, it may also help reduce international conflict between more developed countries as well.

What Should the Next American President Do About China?

Oct 10, 2012
BBC Radio’s Robin Lustig moderated a debate with Elizabeth Economy, Chas W. Freeman, Jr., J. Stapleton Roy, and Yan Xuetong. This debate, the third in a three-part series sponsored by the Carnegie Endowment, was structured around three broad questions on how the next U.S. president ought to engage China.

Civil Liberties in America After 9/11

Oct 03, 2012
Many security experts believe that the question most relevant to the possibility of a “cyber 9/11” attack is not “if” but “when.” What do we need to do to fortify our digital infrastructure against such a worst case scenario? And what are the implications for civil liberties when privacy is already a threatened concept in the virtual world of cyber space? We spoke with Anthony Romero, who became Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union just days before 9/11, to gain his perspective on these and other tough questions.

Initial Report of U.S.-China Security Perceptions Project Released

Sep 20, 2012
This project emerged from an awareness of the growing influence, in both the United States and especially China, of both public and elite attitudes on what many analysts recognize as the increasingly turbulent bilateral security relationship. Its objective is to obtain non-partisan policy-relevant data and insights on the evolving content and influence of such attitudes, as policymakers seek to reduce the likelihood of serious future bilateral crises or conflicts.

Politics Aside, Debt Fix Is Clear

Aug 03, 2012
The formula to avoid the “fiscal cliff” is simple write Jane Harman and Vin Weber: a bipartisan compromise including spending cuts, entitlement reform and changes to the tax code that was outlined nearly two years ago in The Simpson Bowles Act. “No party can solve these knotty issues alone or without compromise,” the former members of Congress write for Politico.

Is Entrepreneurship the Key to Economic Recovery?

Jul 31, 2012
Historically, economic downturns have provided fertile ground for entrepreneurship. Is the same true during the current economic crisis? Amy Wilkinson, who has been studying and reporting on the vital world of entrepreneurs, describes how public policy can spur entrepreneurship and job creation.
Afghan women protesting

Ending Violence Against Women

Jul 13, 2012
Director of the Wilson Center's new Global Women's Leadership Initiative, Rangita del Silva de Alwis joined NPR's The Diane Rehm show to discuss efforts to empower women and change cultural attitudes among men and boys.

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