United States News

There Before Ebola Had a Name

Oct 08, 2014
Larry Altman describes the work of renown virologist Peter Piot after conducting several interviews. "He said he expected discovery of more viruses like Ebola. And despite today’s much safer laboratory procedures, he added, such virulent pathogens could prove just as dangerous," writes Lawrence K. Altman on Dr. Peter Piot's expertise in working with Ebola.

FDR Was The Last Great President. Let's Never Have Another

Oct 08, 2014
"For me, greatness means the following: You confront one of the three greatest nation-encumbering crises that the country faced; you extract from that crisis — as you weather it — some sort of transformative change that makes the nation better forever; and, in time, you are appreciated by your own partisans, as well as your adversaries, as a true national hero," says Aaron David Miller.

After 13 Years, War in Afghanistan Grinds On

Oct 07, 2014
"Even if the war in Afghanistan is ending for U.S. combat forces, it isn't ending for Afghans anytime soon," writes Michael Kugelman.

A Republican for Attorney General?

Oct 02, 2014
"At this point in his presidency, Barack Obama has an opportunity to build consensus. With Eric Holder’s resignation, he should consider taking this opportunity to mend fences and revive a Cabinet once billed as a 'team of rivals.' So how about a Republican for attorney general?" writes Jane Harman.
Webcast

Can America Have (and Does It Want) Another Great President?

Oct 01, 2014
Universal agreement on those American Presidents that have achieved “greatness” yields a short list. Most will agree on Washington, Lincoln, and FDR… but then the debate begins in earnest. In his new book, “The End of Greatness: Why America Can't Have (and Doesn't Want) Another Great President,” Wilson Center Distinguished Scholar Aaron David Miller provides a challenging analysis of the nature of presidential leadership and what is required for a chief executive to attain that status. Miller previews the book in this edition of Wilson Center NOW.

The Nation-Building Trap

Oct 01, 2014
"It's the reality that we're being pulled inexorably like a moth to a flame not just toward a military conflict with Assad, but toward bearing the responsibility for fixing -- or worse for creating -- the new Syria...we may well end up in the very place U.S. President Barack Obama has willfully tried to avoid: nation-building," writes Aaron David Miller.

Congress AWOL on Mideast Action

Oct 01, 2014
"Despite its claims to the contrary, ISIS looks outmatched. But our recent strikes were just an opening salvo. A considered, long-term strategy (including kinetic action) needs a careful framework and congressional authorization. The debate is crucial, and the only way to make room for debate is with a special session of Congress. The president should seek it now," writes Jane Harman.

How Modi’s Evolution From Pariah to Pop Star Could Boost U.S.-India Ties

Oct 01, 2014
"There is something distinctly American about Mr. Modi. His rise from a tea-seller’s son to high office through hard work and a strong embrace of the free market is reminiscent of a Horatio Alger rags-to-riches tale. Additionally, Mr. Modi’s courtship of the Indian diaspora and U.S. business is freighted with positive implications for bilateral ties," says Michael Kugelman.

All the Truth Is Out: The Week Politics Went Tabloid

Sep 30, 2014
Matt Bai, Public Policy Scholar from 2013, recently published his new book, All the Truth Is Out: The Week Politics Went Tabloid, which he worked on during his time at the Wilson Center. The book looks at 1988 Democratic presidential candidate Gary Hart, who withdrew from the race following intense media scrutiny after an alleged affair.

Addicted to Putin

Sep 30, 2014
"Russians have come to depend on their belief in Putin as much as he depends on their support. Instead of serving as a source of stability, as it did in the past, this mutual dependence is driving Russia toward political and economic isolation – with serious consequences for ordinary Russians’ livelihoods," writes Maxim Trudolyubov.

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