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Current Releases

Rebounding Identities: The Politics of Identity in Russia and Ukraine, edited by Dominique Arel and Blair A. Ruble

Rebounding Identities: The Politics of Identity in Russia and Ukraine

An examination of post-Soviet society through ethnic, religious, and linguistic criteria, Rebounding Identities turns what is typically anthropological subject matter into the basis of politics, sociology, and history.

Sino-Japanese Relations: Interaction, Logic, and Transformation by Ming Wan

Sino-Japanese Relations: Interaction, Logic, and Transformation

Author(s)
Ming Wan

In Sino-Japanese Relations, Ming Wan argues that the relationship between China and Japan is politically dispute-prone, cyclical, and downward-trending but manageable; militarily uncertain; economically integrating; psychologically closer in people-to-people contact yet more distant.

Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest, and the 1956 Hungarian Revolt by Charles Gati

Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest, and the 1956 Hungarian Revolt

Author(s)
Charles Gati

The 1956 Hungarian revolution was a key event in the Cold War, demonstrating deep dissatisfaction with both the communist system and Soviet imperialism. Fifty years later, the simplicity of this David and Goliath story should be revisited, according to Charles Gati’s new history of the revolt.

The Toothpaste of Immortality: Self-Construction in the Consumer Age by Elemér Hankiss

The Toothpaste of Immortality: Self-Construction in the Consumer Age

Author(s)
Elemer Hankiss

This lively and insightful account reveals the profound ways in which everyday acts and artifacts of consumer civilization shape our sense of self.

The Three Yugoslavias: State-Building and Legitimation, 1918-2005 by Sabrina P. Ramet

The Three Yugoslavias: State-Building and Legitimation, 1918-2005

Author(s)
Sabrina P. Ramet

In this thematic history of modern Yugoslavia, Sabrina Ramet demonstrates that the instability of the three 20th-century Yugoslav states can be attributed to the failure of succeeding governments to establish the rule of law and political legitimacy.

Strategies of Dominance: The Misdirection of U.S. Foreign Policy by P. Edward Haley

Strategies of Dominance: The Misdirection of U.S. Foreign Policy

Author(s)
P. Edward Haley

In a critical overview of post–Cold War U.S. foreign policy, Strategies of Dominance draws connections between key elements of George W. Bush’s foreign policy and those of his predecessors, Bill Clinton and George H. W. Bush, and proposes a foreign policy alternative that is constructive and tolerant but not amorally “realistic.”

Voting for Russia's Governors: Regional Elections and Accountability under Yeltsin and Putin by Andrew Konitzer

Voting for Russia's Governors: Regional Elections and Accountability under Yeltsin and Putin

Author(s)
Andrew Konitzer

In Russian regional elections, voters have pursued their economic interests with sophistication, overcoming not only incumbents’ enormous advantage in media representation but also corruption and dirty tricks. Andrew Konitzer’s study tracks recent voter behavior in Russia.

Kim Il Sung in the Khrushchev Era: Soviet-DPRK Relations and the Roots of North Korean Despotism, 1953-1964 by Balázs Szalontai

Kim Il Sung in the Khrushchev Era: Soviet-DPRK Relations and the Roots of North Korean Despotism, 1953-1964

Author(s)
Balázs Szalontai

Concentrating on the years 1953–64, Kim Il Sung in the Khrushchev Era describes how North Korea became more despotic even as other Communist countries underwent de-Stalinization.

Rethinking the Economics of War: The Intersection of Need, Creed, and Greed, edited by Cynthia J. Arnson and I. William Zartman

Rethinking the Economics of War: The Intersection of Need, Creed, and Greed

Rethinking the Economics of War questions the adequacy of explaining today’s internal armed conflicts purely in terms of economic factors and reestablishes the importance of identity and grievances in creating and sustaining such wars.

Creating Diversity Capital: Transnational Migrants in Montreal, Washington, and Kyiv by Blair A. Ruble

Creating Diversity Capital: Transnational Migrants in Montreal, Washington, and Kyiv

Author(s)
Blair A. Ruble

How do urban communities accommodate this century’s massive transnational migrations? Creating Diversity Capital examines Montreal, Washington, and Kyiv, and describes how the politics in each of these cities has changed, or failed to change, in the face of the new demographics.

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About Woodrow Wilson Center Press

Woodrow Wilson Center Press publishes books by fellows, other resident scholars, and staff written in substantial part at the Wilson Center.