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Between the State and Islam

Until recently, the study of the Middle East has focused almost exclusively on Islam and on the regime, especially on its non-democratic aspects. It has done so at the expense of accounting fully for the forces of skepticism, liberty, and creativity that struggle against Islamic conformism and state hegemony. Strangely, there seems to be no scholarly awareness of the simple fact that however influential religion appears in word and deed, however evident the trappings of state authority, people come into being, thrive, marry, raise families, think, laugh, and cry without regard to - indeed, sometimes in utter defiance of - the strictures of religious or state authority. This volume examines how Middle Eastern peoples in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries lived and flourished while trying to shape their political and religious surroundings outside the formal structures of established religion and the state.

The United States and Pakistan, 1947-2000: Disenchanted Allies

Author(s)
Dennis Kux

U.S.-Pakistan relations have been extraordinarily volatile, largely a function of the twists and turns of the Cold War. An intimate partnership prevailed in the Eisenhower, Nixon, and Reagan years, and friction during the Kennedy, Johnson, and Carter presidencies. Since the Cold War ended, the partnership has shriveled. The blunt talking to delivered by President Clinton to Pakistan's military dictator during Clinton's March 25, 2000, stopover in Pakistan highlighted U.S.-Pakistani differences. But the Clinton visit also underscored important U.S. interests in Pakistan.

Regional Russia in Transition: Studies from Yaroslavl'

Regional Russia in Transition: Studies from Yaroslavl' examines democracy in a central region of Russia, a largely industrialized heartland off the beaten path from Moscow and Leningrad. Yaroslavl' has been the subject of a series of studies since 1990 by a group of senior U.S. Russianists, several of them contributors to this book. Regional Russia in Transition also includes important work by a Russian historian and a social scientist and an American businessman.

Congress and the People: Deliberative Democracy on Trial

Author(s)
Donald Wolfensberger

Donald R. Wolfensberger asks in Congress and the People whether direct democracy will supplant representative, deliberate government in the United States.

Nationalism and the Crowd in Liberal Hungary, 1848-1914

Author(s)
Alice Freifeld

Hungary's revolutionary crowd of 1848 was defeated in 1849, but crowds of other kinds and crowd politics remained central to Hungary as it fashioned itself over the next half-century. Nationalism and the Crowd in Liberal Hungary, 1848-1914, describes how the crowd's shifting cast of characters participated in the making of Hungary inside the increasingly troubled Austro-Hungarian empire.

Rogue States and U.S. Foreign Policy: Containment after the Cold War by Robert S. Litwak

Rogue States and U.S. Foreign Policy: Containment after the Cold War

Author(s)
Robert S. Litwak

Robert Litwak traces the origins and development of rogue state policy and then assesses its efficacy through detailed case studies of Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. In place of a generic and constricting strategy, he argues for the development of "differentiated" strategies of containment, tailored to the particular circumstances within individual states.

Combating Corruption in Latin America, edited by Joseph S. Tulchin and Ralph H. Espach

Combating Corruption in Latin America

Combating Corruption in Latin America examines the relationship between democratic and market reforms and corruption, including national strategies for its reduction. Authors from across the region, the United States, and Europe, discuss the nature, methods, and historical antecedents of today's corrupt practices, including issues of institutional design, the role of international actors, and culture.

NetPolicy.com: Public Agenda for a Digital World by Leslie David Simon

NetPolicy.com: Public Agenda for a Digital World

Author(s)
Leslie David Simon

In NetPolicy.Com, Leslie David Simon offers a panoramic view of the Internet's cyclonic effects on national and global institutions, ranging from government and finance to health care, education and industry.The book asks how we can encourage the healthy growth of the Net and avoid its darker side effects. 

The Future of Merit: Twenty Years after the Civil Service Reform Act

The Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 was the most far reaching reform of the federal government personnel system since the merit system was created in 1883. The Future of Merit reviews the aims and rates the accomplishments of the 1978 law and assesses the status of the civil service. How has it held up in the light of the National Performance Review? What will become of it in a globalizing international system or in a government that regards people as customers rather than citizens?

The American Planning Tradition: Culture and Policy, edited by Robert Fishman

The American Planning Tradition: Culture and Policy

This book looks at the figures and themes that have shaped American public spaces, schools, parks, libraries and cities.

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About Woodrow Wilson Center Press

Woodrow Wilson Center Press publishes books by fellows, other resident scholars, and staff written in substantial part at the Wilson Center.