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Asian Americans and Politics: Perspectives, Experiences, Prospects, edited by Gordon H. Chang

Asian Americans and Politics: Perspectives, Experiences, Prospects

This volume is the first to take a broad-ranging look at the engagement of Asian Americans with American politics. Its contributors come from a variety of disciplines—history, political science, sociology, and urban studies—and from the practical political realm.

The Breakdown of Class Politics: A Debate on Post-Industrial Stratification, edited by Terry Nichols Clark and Seymour Martin Lipset

The Breakdown of Class Politics: A Debate on Post-Industrial Stratification

Class and its linkage to politics became a controversial and exciting topic again in the 1990s. Terry Clark and Seymour Martin Lipset published “Are Social Classes Dying?” in 1991, which sparked a lively debate and much new research. This book draws on four main conferences organized by the editors.

Economic Cold War: America's Embargo against China and the Sino-Soviet Alliance, 1949-1963 by Shu Guang Zhang

Economic Cold War: America's Embargo against China and the Sino-Soviet Alliance, 1949-1963

Author(s)
Shu Guang Zhang

Why would countries impose economic sanctions in pursuit of their foreign policy objectives, and how effective are such economic weapons? This book examines the economic sanctions imposed by the United States and its allies against the People’s Republic of China in the 1950s, and their effects on Chinese domestic policy and the Sino-Soviet alliance.

Between the State and Islam, edited by Charles E. Butterworth and I. William Zartman

Between the State and Islam

Until recently, Middle East studies have focused almost exclusively on Islam and on the regime, especially on its non-democratic aspects. This volume examines how Middle Eastern peoples in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries lived and flourished while trying to shape their political and religious surroundings outside the formal structures of established religion and the state.

The United States and Pakistan, 1947-2000: Disenchanted Allies by Dennis Kux

The United States and Pakistan, 1947-2000: Disenchanted Allies

Author(s)
Dennis Kux

U.S.-Pakistan relations have been extraordinarily volatile, largely a function of the twists and turns of the Cold War. Dennis Kux has written the first comprehensive account of this roller coaster relationship from the 1940s to the end of the century.

Regional Russia in Transition: Studies from Yaroslavl', edited by Jeffrey W. Hahn

Regional Russia in Transition: Studies from Yaroslavl'

Russia’s sub-national democratization will largely shape Russians’ views of their new government, willingness to participate in it, and trust in its ability to deliver. Regional Russia in Transition: Studies from Yaroslavl’ examines democracy in a central region of Russia, a largely industrialized heartland off the beaten path from Moscow and Leningrad.

Congress and the People: Deliberative Democracy on Trial by Donald R. Wolfensberger

Congress and the People: Deliberative Democracy on Trial

Author(s)
Donald Wolfensberger

In Congress and the People, Donald R. Wolfensberger asks whether some form of direct democracy will supplant representative, deliberate government in the United States.

Nationalism and the Crowd in Liberal Hungary, 1848-1914 by Alice Freifeld

Nationalism and the Crowd in Liberal Hungary, 1848-1914

Author(s)
Alice Freifeld

Hungary’s revolutionary crowd of 1848 was defeated in 1849, but crowd politics remained central to Hungary over the next half-century. Nationalism and the Crowd in Liberal Hungary, 1848–1914 describes how the crowd’s shifting cast of characters participated in the making of Hungary inside the increasingly troubled Austro-Hungarian empire.

The Future of Merit: Twenty Years after the Civil Service Reform Act, edited by James P. Pfiffner and Douglas A. Brook

The Future of Merit: Twenty Years after the Civil Service Reform Act

The Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 was the most far reaching reform of the federal government personnel system since the merit system was created in 1883. The Future of Merit reviews the aims and rates the accomplishments of the 1978 law and assesses the status of the civil service. 

Rogue States and U.S. Foreign Policy: Containment after the Cold War by Robert S. Litwak

Rogue States and U.S. Foreign Policy: Containment after the Cold War

Author(s)
Robert S. Litwak

Robert Litwak traces the origins and development of rogue state policy and then assesses its efficacy through detailed case studies of Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. In place of a generic and constricting strategy, he argues for the development of “differentiated” strategies of containment, tailored to the particular circumstances within individual states.

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Woodrow Wilson Center Press publishes books by fellows, other resident scholars, and staff written in substantial part at the Wilson Center.