The Woodrow Wilson Center Press

Current Releases

Latin American Populism in the Twenty-First Century, edited by Carlos de la Torre and Cynthia J. Arnson

Latin American Populism in the Twenty-First Century

Latin American Populism in the Twenty-first Century explains the emergence of today’s radical populism and places it in historical context, identifying continuities as well as differences from both the classical populism of the 1930s and 1940s and the neo-populism of the 1990s.

 Communism on Tomorrow Street: Mass Housing and Everyday Life after Stalin by Steven E. Harris

Communism on Tomorrow Street: Mass Housing and Everyday Life after Stalin

Author(s)
Steven E. Harris

Communism on Tomorrow Street examines how, beginning under Khrushchev in 1953, a generation of Soviet citizens moved from overcrowded communal dwellings to modern single-family apartments, later dubbed khrushchevka. Arguing that moving to a separate apartment allowed ordinary urban dwellers to experience Khrushchev’s thaw, Steven E. Harris fundamentally shifts interpretation of the period.

The Great Game, 1856–1907: Russo-British Relations in Central and East Asia by Evgeny Sergeev

The Great Game, 1856–1907: Russo-British Relations in Central and East Asia

Author(s)
Evgeny Sergeev

The Great Game, 1856–1907 presents a new view of the British-Russian competition for dominance in Central Asia in the second half of the nineteenth century. Evgeny Sergeev offers a complex and novel point of view by synthesizing official collections of documents, parliamentary papers, political pamphlets, memoirs, contemporary journalism, and guidebooks from unpublished and less studied primary sources in Russian, British, Indian, Georgian, Uzbek, and Turkmen archives.

State Secularism and Lived Religion in Soviet Russia and Ukraine, edited by Catherine Wanner

State Secularism and Lived Religion in Soviet Russia and Ukraine

State Secularism and Lived Religion in Soviet Russia and Ukraine is a collection of essays written by a broad cross-section of scholars from around the world that explores the myriad forms religious expression and religious practice took in Soviet society in conjunction with the Soviet government's commitment to secularization.

Divided Together: The United States and the Soviet Union in the United Nations, 1945-1965, by Ilya V. Gaiduk

Divided Together: The United States and the Soviet Union in the United Nations, 1945-1965

Author(s)
Ilya V. Gaiduk

Divided Together studies US and Soviet policy toward the United Nations during the first two decades of the Cold War. It sheds new light on a series of key episodes, beginning with the prehistory of the UN, an institution that aimed to keep the Cold War cold. 

The Jewish Movement in the Soviet Union, by Yaacov Ro'i

The Jewish Movement in the Soviet Union

Yaacov Ro’i and his collaborators provide the first scholarly survey of one of the most successful Soviet dissident movements, one which ultimately affected and reflected the demise of a superpower’s stature.

 

 

Russia, the Near Abroad, and the West: Lessons from the Moldova-Transdniestria Conflict by William H. Hill

Russia, the Near Abroad, and the West: Lessons from the Moldova-Transdniestria Conflict

Author(s)
William H. Hill

Post-communist Russia turned against the West in the 2000s, losing its earlier eagerness to collaborate with western Europe on economic and security matters and adopting a suspicious and defensive posture. This book, investigating a diplomatic negotiation involving Russia and the formerly Soviet Moldova, explains this dramatic shift in Russian foreign policy.

National Identities and Bilateral Relations: Widening Gaps in East Asia and Chinese Demonization of the United States, edited by Gilbert Rozman

National Identities and Bilateral Relations: Widening Gaps in East Asia and Chinese Demonization of the United States

The second of Gilbert Rozman's contributed volumes on East Asian national identity traces how efforts to draw a sharp divide between one country's identity and that of another shape relations in the post-Cold War era. It examines the two-way relations of Japan, South Korea, and China, introducing the concept of a national identity gap to estimate the degree to which the identities of two countries target each other as negative contrasts. This concept is then applied to China's reinterpretation from 2009 to 2011 of the gap between its identity and that of the United States. 

The Soviet Cuban Missile Crisis: Castro, Mikoyan, Kennedy, Khrushchev and the Missiles of November by Sergo Mikoyan

The Soviet Cuban Missile Crisis: Castro, Mikoyan, Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the Missiles of November

Author(s)
Sergo A. Mikoyan

This book rewrites the conventional history of the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis by drawing on secret transcripts of top-level diplomacy undertaken by Anastas Mikoyan, the number-two Soviet leader under Nikita Khrushchev. 

In the Wake of War: Democratization and Internal Armed Conflict in Latin America, edited by Cynthia J. Arnson

In the Wake of War: Democratization and Internal Armed Conflict in Latin America

In the Wake of War assesses the consequences of civil war for democratization in Latin America, focusing on questions of state capacity. Contributors focus on seven countries—Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru—where state weakness fostered conflict and the task of state reconstruction presents multiple challenges.

 

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About Woodrow Wilson Center Press

Woodrow Wilson Center Press publishes books by fellows, other resident scholars, and staff written in substantial part at the Wilson Center.