The Woodrow Wilson Center Press

Current Releases

Urban Diversity:  Space, Culture, and Inclusive Pluralism in Cities Worldwide, edited by Caroline Wanjiku Kihato, Mejgan Massoumi, Blair A. Ruble, Pep Subirós, and Allison M. Garland

Urban Diversity: Space, Culture, and Inclusive Pluralism in Cities Worldwide

As the world’s urban populations grow, cities become spaces where increasingly diverse peoples negotiate such differences as language, citizenship, ethnicity and race, class and wealth, and gender. Using a comparative framework, Urban Diversity examines the multiple meanings of inclusion and exclusion in fast—changing urban contexts.

Orange Revolution and Aftermath:  Mobilization, Apathy, and the State in Ukraine, edited by Paul D'Anieri

Orange Revolution and Aftermath: Mobilization, Apathy, and the State in Ukraine

After the success of the Orange Revolution, it was widely expected that civil society groups would take an increasingly prominent role in Ukrainian politics, reinvigorating democracy. Yet that influence diminished rapidly, and when the new government also became tainted with corruption, there was no protest or counterattack. Orange Revolution and Aftermath: Mobilization, Apathy, and the State in Ukraine explores why the influence of civil society groups waned so quickly.

Washington's U Street:  A Biography by Blair A. Ruble

Washington's U Street: A Biography

Author(s)
Blair A. Ruble

Washington’s U Street: A Biography traces the history of the U Street neighborhood in Washington, D.C., from its Civil War–era origins to its recent gentrification.

Realism, Tolerance, and Liberalism in the Czech National Awakening: Legacies of the Bohemian Reformation by Zdeněk V. David

Realism, Tolerance, and Liberalism in the Czech National Awakening: Legacies of the Bohemian Reformation

Author(s)
Zdenék V. David

In this meticulous intellectual history, Zdeněk V. David traces the roots of the eighteenth-century Czech National Awakening, not to the Counter Reformation but to the Utraquist church (often called “Hussite”), which arose in pre-Protestant Bohemia.

Mexico's Democratic Challenges: Politics, Government, and Society, edited by Andrew Selee and Jacqueline Peschard

Mexico's Democratic Challenges: Politics, Government, and Society

Author(s)
Andrew Selee, Jacqueline Peschard

Only a decade ago, Mexico saw the end of seventy years of single-party hegemonic rule and the first free and fair election in its history. This comprehensive new collection examines recent political developments in Mexico—including its 2006 election and the breakdown in consensus that nearly resulted—in order to assess the progress of its democratization.

Europe's Destiny: The Old Lady and the Bull by Attila Marján

Europe's Destiny: The Old Lady and the Bull

Author(s)
Attila Marjan

In this engaging, clever, and provocative account, Attila Marján offers a disquieting analysis of the complex challenges that Europe faces in the global marketplace.

The Caged Phoenix: Can India Fly? by Dipankar Gupta

The Caged Phoenix: Can India Fly?

Author(s)
Dipankar Gupta

Dipankar Gupta, one of India’s foremost thinkers on social and economic issues, takes a critical—and controversial—look at the limits of the Indian success story in The Caged Phoenix.

Neoconservatives in U.S. Foreign Policy under Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush: Voices behind the Throne by Jesús Velasco

Neoconservatives in U.S. Foreign Policy under Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush: Voices behind the Throne

Author(s)
Jesús Velasco

Jesús Velasco examines the origins and history of the neoconservative political movement so closely identified with the George W. Bush administration's policies of regime change and democratization.

The Fog of Law: Pragmatism, Security, and International Law by Michael J. Glennon

The Fog of Law: Pragmatism, Security, and International Law

Author(s)
Michael J. Glennon

Focusing on questions of state security, The Fog of Law considers the nature of obligation in international law. In so doing, it challenges the prevailing theories of obligation based on natural law or positive law approaches.

Rock and Roll in the Rocket City: The West, Identity, and Ideology in Soviet Dniepropetrovsk, 1960–1985 by Sergei I. Zhuk

Rock and Roll in the Rocket City: The West, Identity, and Ideology in Soviet Dniepropetrovsk, 1960–1985

Author(s)
Sergei I. Zhuk

In Rock and Roll in the Rocket City, Sergei I. Zhuk assesses the impact of Westernization on the city’s youth, examining the degree to which the consumption of Western music, movies, and literature ultimately challenged the ideological control maintained by state officials.

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About Woodrow Wilson Center Press

Woodrow Wilson Center Press publishes books by fellows, other resident scholars, and staff written in substantial part at the Wilson Center.