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Current Releases

Connecting Histories: Decolonization and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, 1945–1962, edited by Christopher Goscha and Christian Ostermann

Connecting Histories: Decolonization and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, 1945–1962

Connecting Histories draws on newly available archival documentation from both Western and Asian countries to explore decolonization, the Cold War, and the establishment of a new international order in post-World War II Southeast Asia.

Germany Says No: The Iraq War and the Future of German Foreign and Security Policy by Dieter Dettke

Germany Says No: The Iraq War and the Future of German Foreign and Security Policy

Author(s)
Dieter Dettke

Germany Says “No” reviews the country’s actions in major international crises from the first Gulf War to the war with Iraq, concluding—in contrast to many models of contemporary German foreign policy—that the country’s civilian power paradigm has been succeeded by a defensive structural realist approach.

Purifying the Nation: Population Exchange and Ethnic Cleansing in Nazi-Allied Romania by Vladimir Solonari

Purifying the Nation: Population Exchange and Ethnic Cleansing in Nazi-Allied Romania

Author(s)
Vladimir Solonari

Purifying the Nation is a provocative new exploration of the Holocaust in World War II Romania. Vladimir Solonari argues that the persecution of Jews and Roma by the Romanian government was not a response to pressure from Nazi Germany, but rather stemmed from the vision of an ethnically pure Romania which was traditional to Romanian nationalism.

Rebellious Satellite: Poland 1956 by Pawel Machcewicz

Rebellious Satellite: Poland 1956

Author(s)
Paweł Machcewicz

Rebellious Satellite: Poland 1956 offers a social history of the mass movements that prompted political change and altered Polish-Soviet relations in 1956 but avoided a Soviet armed response.

In Praise of Deadlock: How Partisan Struggle Makes Better Laws by W. Lee Rawls

In Praise of Deadlock: How Partisan Struggle Makes Better Laws

Author(s)
W. Lee Rawls

In Praise of Deadlock explains the legislative process and its checkpoints, with a noncomformist respect for the hurdles and hang-ups in the American system. W. Lee Rawls offers a candid perspective on partisan struggle, which he sees as essential to advancing policy and generating consensus. 

Women in Power in Post-Communist Parliaments, edited by Marilyn Rueschemeyer and Sharon L. Wolchik

Women in Power in Post-Communist Parliaments

Women in Power in Post-Communist Parliaments examines the life and work of women who have reached positions of political power after the end of communism in Europe.

Cities after the Fall of Communism: Reshaping Cultural Landscapes and European Identity, edited by John Czaplicka, Nida Gelazis, and Blair A. Ruble

Cities after the Fall of Communism: Reshaping Cultural Landscapes and European Identity

Cities after the Fall of Communism traces the cultural reorientation of East European cities since 1989. Analyzing the architecture, commemorative practices, and urban planning of cities such as Lviv, Vilnius, and Odessa, the contributors illustrate how history may be selectively re-imagined in light of present political and cultural realities.

Enterprising Women in Urban Zimbabwe: Gender, Microbusiness, and Globalization by Mary Johnson Osirim

Enterprising Women in Urban Zimbabwe: Gender, Microbusiness, and Globalization

Author(s)
Mary Johnson Osirim

Mary Johnson Osirim investigates the business and personal experiences of women entrepreneurs in Harare and Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, to understand their successes, challenges, and contributions to development during the 1990s.

Stalin's Police: Public Order and Mass Repression in the USSR, 1926-1941 by Paul Hagenloh

Stalin's Police: Public Order and Mass Repression in the USSR, 1926–1941

Author(s)
Paul Hagenloh

Stalin’s Police offers a new interpretation of the mass repressions associated with the Stalinist terror of the late 1930s.

Participatory Institutions in Democratic Brazil by Leonardo Avritzer

Participatory Institutions in Democratic Brazil

Author(s)
Leonardo Avritzer

Brazil has conducted some of the world’s most stunning experiments in participatory democracy, most notably the creation of city budgets through local citizens’ meetings. Leonardo Avritzer introduces a fresh analytical approach to reveal the social and institutional conditions that make civic participation most effective.

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Woodrow Wilson Center Press publishes books by fellows, other resident scholars, and staff written in substantial part at the Wilson Center.