Asia Program

Events

Governing the Ungovernable: Frontier Rule along the Afghanistan-Pakistan Border and Beyond

June 03, 2015 // 3:00pm4:30pm
The Afghanistan-Pakistan border region is a large, ungoverned space and a constant source of instability. Both countries have long grappled with the question of how to rule this rugged frontier, which many regard as ungovernable. This talk examines the evolution of frontier rule in the Afghanistan-Pakistan region, and how similar models of governance have been applied as far afield as Kenya, Nigeria, Argentina, and even the United States.
Webcast

Blurring Borders: National, Subnational, and Regional Orders in East Asia

June 01, 2015 // 8:30am3:30pm
In Japan and China, resurgent nationalism has reinforced the political importance of the region’s most powerful nation-states, fed international tensions in the region, and created additional challenges for U.S. policy.

Afghanistan’s Unsung Heroes: Reflections of Afghan Women Leaders and Implications for U.S. Policy

May 27, 2015 // 2:30pm4:30pm
In Afghanistan, the future of women is highly uncertain. International troops have left the country, and Afghanistan’s new government is exploring the possibility of reconciliation talks with the Taliban. The new book Contested Terrain: Reflections with Afghan Women Leaders, by Sally L. Kitch, chronicles the stories of two Afghan professional women, Marzia Basel and Jamila Afghani, as they navigate both patriarchal culture and international intervention.
Webcast

An Enduring Revolution: Pakistani Women’s Collective Action for Change

May 05, 2015 // 3:00pm4:30pm
The role of women in many developing countries has traditionally been understood as that of a passive receiver of repression or services. Fouzia Saeed’s research findings challenge this view. At this event, Dr. Saeed will share the outcome of her work during her time as the Wilson Center’s 2014-15 Pakistan Scholar.
Webcast

Re-Engaging the United States in Asia: TPP, AIIB, and Competing Frameworks in the Region

April 24, 2015 // 9:00am11:00am
From the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement to the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, new economic relations and partnerships are being established across the Asia-Pacific region and beyond. How the United States could utilize existing frameworks, or suggest alternatives, to sustain and expand regional ties remains unclear.

The Third Annual Nancy Bernkopf Tucker Memorial Lecture on U.S.-East Asia Relations

April 20, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Thomas Fingar, Oksenberg-Rohlen Distinguished Fellow in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University, former deputy director of national intelligence for analysis and former chairman of the National Intelligence Council, discusses U.S. policy toward China.

Hafu: The Mixed-Race Experience in Japan

April 13, 2015 // 2:00pm4:15pm
With nearly 98 percent of the population believed to be nationals of the country, Japan can seem to be a racially homogenous society. For foreigners already calling Japan home, though, living in a country where there is little racial diversity can be a challenge. That includes those who are half-Japanese.
Webcast

Pakistan's Intensified Countermilitancy Push: Real Deal or False Hope

April 02, 2015 // 3:00pm4:30pm
After the terrorist attack on an army-run school in Peshawar in December 2014, Pakistan vowed to step up efforts to combat militancy, and to eliminate its policy of distinguishing between “good” and “bad” militants. Some observers, however, are skeptical that lasting progress will be made.
Webcast

The Modi Effect: Inside Narendra Modi’s Campaign to Transform India

March 30, 2015 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Nearly one year ago, India kicked off a five-week election process that would ultimately produce a resounding victory for Narendra Modi. With more than 800 million eligible voters, India’s 2014 national election was the largest—and longest—in history. Lance Price was given exclusive access to Modi and his top advisers to write The Modi Effect.

New Alliances for Asia? Prospects for Relations Between Japan, India, and the United States

March 27, 2015 // 3:30pm5:00pm
Concerns about making the U.S. rebalance to Asia a reality may be on the rise, but there is no doubt about a rebalance of power dynamics within Asia. As the region’s two largest democracies, Japan and India have numerous mutual interests and concerns amid growing tensions across the Asia-Pacific and beyond.

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