Asia Program

Events

The Nuanced Australian; U.S. Defence Relationship

This paper is a longer version of a presentation at "Partnership in the Pacific: U.S.-Australia Cooperation and Asia," June 1, 2005, sponsored by the Asia Program.

Pakistan's Number One Threat

Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has repeatedly declared that his number one priority is rebuilding his country’s economy. But Wilson Center and Asia Program Public Policy Scholar Farahnaz Ispahani warns, in an article published in the Foreign Policy’s AFPAK channel, that the Sharif government may face an even more urgent task: combatting the domestic terrorism that threatens the very future of Pakistan.

Vietnam’s China Dilemma: Steering in New Strategic Environment

Vietnam’s relationship with China is a test of the strategic challenge it faces against a long historical backdrop. Hanoi’s rapprochement with the US and its joining ASEAN are manifestations of its diplomatic adroitness, writes Wilson Center Public Policy Scholar Marvin Ott in a recent edition of RSIS Commentaries.

A New Cold War? The Future of US-China Relations

The shadow of the Cold War still looms large over global affairs. Could increasing competition between China and the United States lead us back to another super-power stand-off? China expert Cheng Li discusses the consequences of a downturn in US-China relations.

Wilson Center and Korea Foundation Establish Junior Scholar Program

The program will provide Korean students currently enrolled in an advanced degree program the opportunity to spend between three to six months at the Center conducting advanced research on an important public policy issue or a topic in international history.

George W. Bush and North Korea: 2001-04

Why the surprisingly relaxed US approach during George W. Bush's first term to the challenge posed by the North Korean nuclear weapons program? For an exploration of this seeming paradox by Asia Program Director Robert M. Hathaway, click here.

The Policy Space Debate: Does a Globalized and Multilateral Economy Constrain Development Policies?

This Special Report asks whether global economic policies and rules constrain national policy space to enable developing countries to choose the best policy mix for achieving sustainable and equitable development. This central question is addressed through critical assessments of how the policy frameworks of the international financial institutions, exchange rate regimes, as well as intellectual property rights affect the development paradigms of developing countries. Edited by Bhumika Muchhala. Send an email to asia@wilsoncenter.org for a free copy or click on the attachment for a free PDF version.

Pages

Experts & Staff