Asia Program

Events

Land Grab? The Race for the World's Farmland

The world is experiencing a grain rush. With increasing frequency, food-importing countries and private investors are acquiring farmland across the developing world. This new publication marks one of the first efforts in the United States to bring together perspectives from international organizations, farmers, and investors alike about a trend often referred to as a new phase of the world food crisis. Edited by Michael Kugelman and Susan L. Levenstein. Send an email to asia@wilsoncenter.org for a free copy or click on the attachment for a free PDF version.

The Great Game That Won't Be

This article is part of a monthly series for Foreign Policy by Michael Kugelman that highlights possible post-2014 scenarios for Afghanistan.

East China Sea Dispute = End of East Asian Miracle?

"Neither Tokyo nor Beijing has shown any signs of backing down on their claims to the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands. What’s more, as Washington gets pulled ever more into taking sides in the dispute, the stakes are getting even higher for the situation to explode," writes Shihoko Goto in The Globalist.

Responding to Pakistan's Water Crisis

How can the world help Pakistan respond to its widespread and deadly water crisis? In a new policy brief published by the Norwegian Peacebuilding Center, program associate Michael Kugelman examines the opportunities and constraints faced by the international community in its efforts to help reduce the country's water woes.

Northeast Asia’s eternal triangle is really an American affair of sorts

Takashi Terada, who earlier this year held appointment as a Wilson Center Japan Scholar, explores the shifting power dynamics in Northeast Asia, and what the evolving Japan-China-South Korea triangular relationship may mean for the United States.

Pakistan has more than U.S. legislation to worry about

Asia Program director Robert M. Hathaway looks at congressional sentiment that Pakistan should "do more" in the war against terrorism. Read oped

Pakistan's Runaway Urbanization

Pakistan is South Asia’s most rapidly urbanizing country. In barely 10 years, nearly 50 percent of its 180 million people will live in cities (a third do today). This new publication discusses the drivers of Pakistan’s urbanization, and examines the country’s major urban challenges. It also offers a series of policy recommendations and ways forward to help tackle a trend that won’t be going away anytime soon. Hard copies can be requested by sending an email to asia@wilsoncenter.org

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Experts & Staff