Asia Program

Events

Chinese Foreign Policy: A New Era Dawns

As its economic clout grows, Beijing is forging its own path in international relations, scholar Anne-Marie Brady writes for The Diplomat.

India's China Fears

In his latest op-ed , published in Pakistan's Dawn newspaper, Program Associate Michael Kugelman argues that in New Delhi, "lingering fears about Pakistan are increasingly being eclipsed by ever-growing alarm about China."

Seabed Petroleum in Northeast Asia: Conflict or Cooperation?

With its energy needs steadily multiplying, Northeast Asia will require ever increasing petroleum imports for its economic expansion and survival. This report draws both on extensive field research in Northeast Asia and on two unprecedented workshops in Beijing co-sponsored by the Wilson Center and the China Institute of International Studies (an arm of the Chinese Foreign Ministry). Selected working papers by conference participants from China, Japan, and North and South Korea are included. Send an email to asia@wilsoncenter.org for a free copy or click on the attachment for a free PDF version.

U.S.-Pakistan Relations

In an article in the March 7, 2008, Friday Times, Asia Program director Robert M. Hathaway suggests that as the two countries consider how best to restructure their bilateral relations in the aftermath of Pakistan's February elections, it might be useful for Islamabad and Washington to think in terms of mutually reinforcing obligations toward each other.

Policy Brief: Dealing with a Rising China

Washington and Beijing both consider good bilateral relations to be vital, but their growing strategic rivalry has the potential to evolve into mutual antagonism. In this new policy brief, published as the new leadership was announced in Beijing, China expert Stapleton Roy argues that the US should focus on regional engagement through multilateral organizations like ASEAN, as opposed to its military presence in the region.

Japan's Vision For East Asia

As questions about U.S. commitment to its rebalance to the Asia-Pacific region remain, how Japan sees its own role in East Asia continues to evolve. The changing nature of Tokyo’s relations with Beijing and Seoul, and Japan’s internal debate about whether it should become a “normal” country with greater defense capabilities are among some key issues discussed in the Wilson Center’s latest publication.

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Experts & Staff