Asia Program

Events

India and the US Pivot to Asia

The US strategic plan is to continue providing global security with emphasis on “rebalance toward the Asia-Pacific region.” Such a pivot is not new, but has been in play since the end of the Cold War, argues Robert M. Hathaway, director of the Asia Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. The strategy requires a long-term partnership with India, as an economic and security anchor in the region. Priorities for both countries vary, particularly in regard to China, leading to divisions within each country as well. Many in India do not want their nation to take part in any Sino-American cold war or conflict and accuse the US of ignoring shenanigans from Pakistan. Indians are also wary about US plans to withdraw troops from Afghanistan and the likely resulting chaos. Both countries have conservatives who oppose reliance on partnerships and agreements that could constrain their military. Ultimately, Hathaway concludes, strength of nations as global actors depends on ensuring economic security and meeting domestic challenges. – YaleGlobal

Wilson Center Awards Japan Scholarship to Isao Miyaoka

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars appointed Associate Professor Isao Miyaoka as the Wilson Center's new Japan Scholar. Professor Miyaoka will spend two months in residence at the Wilson Center, beginning in February 2009, carrying out a research project on the U.S.-Japan alliance and its evolution from an expedient alliance to a robust security community.

East Asia: Leaving Post-War Angst Behind

Irrational nationalism is driving an ever-deeper wedge between Japan, China, and South Korea. All three countries face considerable economic challenges which will be better tackled together, instead of picking at the old wounds from World War II, argues Northeast Asia associate Shihoko Goto in The Globalist.

Pakistan Scholar Simbal Khan Weighs in on U.S.-Pakistan Relationship

The Wilson Center's Pakistan Scholar offers insights about the U.S.-Pakistan relationship as President Obama prepares for his second term.

Japan's Vision for East Asia

As questions about U.S. commitment to its rebalance to the Asia-Pacific region remain, how Japan sees its own role in East Asia continues to evolve. The changing nature of Tokyo’s relations with Beijing and Seoul, and Japan’s internal debate about whether it should become a “normal” country with greater defense capabilities are among some key issues discussed in the Wilson Center’s latest publication, Japan’s Vision for East Asia: Diplomacy Amid Geopolitical Risks. Hard copies are available upon request by contacting asia@wilsoncenter.org.

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