Asia Program

Events

Land Grab? The Race for the World's Farmland

The world is experiencing a grain rush. With increasing frequency, food-importing countries and private investors are acquiring farmland across the developing world. This new publication marks one of the first efforts in the United States to bring together perspectives from international organizations, farmers, and investors alike about a trend often referred to as a new phase of the world food crisis. Edited by Michael Kugelman and Susan L. Levenstein. Send an email to asia@wilsoncenter.org for a free copy or click on the attachment for a free PDF version.
Naheed Farid, Member of Parliament, Afghanistan

Afghanistan: The View From Parliament

With an upcoming presidential election and the anticipated withdrawal of U.S. troops, 2014 will be a very important year for Afghanistan. Naheed Farid, Afghanistan’s youngest member of Parliament and a woman, talks about the concerns and hopes for women and young people in her country.

Northeast Asia’s eternal triangle is really an American affair of sorts

Takashi Terada, who earlier this year held appointment as a Wilson Center Japan Scholar, explores the shifting power dynamics in Northeast Asia, and what the evolving Japan-China-South Korea triangular relationship may mean for the United States.

Defusing the Bomb: Overcoming Pakistan's Population Challenge

The Asia Program and Environmental Change and Security Program will host a conference on June 9, examining not a when-does-the-bomb-explode scenario, but instead one of what-if-any-steps-can-be-taken-to-put-the-bomb-out.

Pakistan's Sectarian Meltdown

Stability is Washington’s core interest in nuclear-armed, volatile Pakistan. This is why it agonizes over the Pakistani Taliban’s (TTP) vicious campaign of anti-state terror. Yet, it’s arguably sectarian violence that poses the greatest threat to Pakistan’s long-term stability, writes Michael Kugelman in The National Interest.

George Bush's Unfinished Asian Agenda

The record of the Bush administration in East Asia over thepast four years is a mixed one, but with significantaccomplishments. Nonetheless, nagging problems persistthat, if not adequately addressed, could create considerabledifficulties for the president during his second term. By Robert M. Hathaway.

Nancy Bernkopf Tucker Lecture Series in U.S.-East Asia Relations Starting 2013

The Wilson Center’s Asia Program will create an annual lecture series on U.S.-East Asian relations, named after noted diplomatic historian and Wilson Center Senior Scholar Nancy Bernkopf Tucker.

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Experts & Staff