Events

The stars align at Canada's recent university mission to Brazil

Public Policy Scholar Ted Hewitt discusses the Brazil-Canada education relationship

The Brazilian Challenge: How to Manage Asymmetrical Regional Relations Beyond the OAS

View the latest article by Paulo Sotero, director of the Brazil Institute in the most recent issue of Revista CIBOD d'afers internacionals.

Promoting Democracy and Rights at Work: Making a Difference

On September 18, 2007, the Brazil Institute and the Program on Science, Technology, America, and the Global Economy (STAGE) of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars hosted a two-panel conference sponsored by the ILO to present and analyze the main findings of the independent valuation Rights at Work: An Assessment of the Declaration's Technical Cooperation in Selected Countries.

Senators score high marks on Brazil report

Released with little fanfare last month, the report has largely escaped media attention. This is a pity. To date, Canada has produced no more insightful and salient strategic document on future prospects with Brazil than this.

Brazil Institute Outreach

This section provides links to past and current Brazil Institute outreach efforts.

Article by Paulo Sotero published on ForeignPolicy.com

'What Lula can Teach 'White People'""When Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva last week blamed "white people with blue eyes" for the global economic meltdown, it was an odd gaffe for a leader known and respected around the world for his pragmatism. 'Lula had a Chávez day,' wrote the São Paulo daily Estadao, discounting the unfortunate utterance made in Brasilia at a joint press conference with British Prime Minister Gordon Brown." [Read full article]

Dilma Needs Davos More Than Davos Needs Dilma

For now, Rousseff's comfortable position in opinion polls gives her space in Davos to talk about plans for fiscal tightening and economic opening, which would create confidence among investors, writes Paulo Sotero.

Climate Change and Biofuels

Sugarcane ethanol is not the villain that it is often made out to be and neither is the sugarcane industry. In Brazil, the sugarcane industry has set out to convince the Brazilian government to adopt a carbon cap and trade system domestically, independently of international negotiations. It is in their interest to reinsert the positive environmental externalities accrued from sugarcane ethanol use and production into the market system. It makes economic and environmental sense and it might spur a value-added product. The next best thing after organic sugar is carbon neutral sugarcane ethanol.

Pages

Experts & Staff