Events

The Phenomenon of Solidarity: Pictures From the History of Poland, 1980-1981

August 29, 2011 // 5:00pm7:00pm
The Phenomenon of Solidarity commemorates the 30th anniversary of the founding of the movement, and highlights formative moments in its history.
Webcast

Book Discussion: After Leaning to One Side: China and Its Allies in the Cold War

August 15, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Wilson Center Public Policy Scholar Shen Zhihua will discuss his latest book, After Leaning to One Side: China and Its Allies in the Cold War.
Webcast

Inauguration Ceremony and Reception: ECNU-Wilson Center Cold War Studies Initiative

August 15, 2011 // 3:00pm3:45pm
The Woodrow Wilson Center is pleased to announce an important new project, the ECNU-Wilson Center Cold War Studies Initiative which is a natural outgrowth of the longstanding, close relationship between the Wilson Center's flagship Cold War International History Project (CWIHP) and East China Normal University's (ECNU) Cold War International Studies Center.

Offsite Conference: The Cold War: History, Memory, Representation

July 14, 2011 // 7:00pm10:00pm
Co-sponsored by the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies, Freie Universitat Berlin, this international and interdisciplinary conference will discuss the main features of the East­-West conflict, probe its conflicting memories and analyze its cultural representations.
Webcast

The Wars of Afghanistan: Messianic Terrorism, Tribal Conflicts, and the Failures of Great Powers

July 13, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
The Wars of Afghanistan offers perspective on how Afghanistan's history as a "shatter zone" for foreign invaders and its tribal society have shaped the modern Afghan narrative. It brings to life the misinformed secret operations by foreign intelligence agencies, including the Soviet NKVD and KGB, the Pakistani ISI, and the CIA.

Offsite Conference: Alliances and Borders in the Making and Unmaking of Regional Powers

July 07, 2011 // 9:30am1:00pm
In cooperation with CWIHP, the Slavic Research Center at Hokkaido University is organizing a conference on Alliances and Borders in the Making and Unmaking of Regional Powers.
Webcast

Conventional Arms Control in Europe During the Cold War: New Insights From the Archives

June 16, 2011 // 9:30am11:00am
Christoph Bluth, professor of international studies at the University of Leeds will discuss his on-going research on the history of the Mutual and Balanced Force Reductions (MBFR) negotiations.
Webcast

Brazil, Argentina, and the Road to the NPT

June 15, 2011 // 4:30pm6:00pm
For several decades Argentina and Brazil sought to develop their own indigenous nuclear programs and tried to resist the expansion of the global non-proliferation regime. Deep mutual suspicion coupled with status competition colored their relationship and their standing in the face of the major nuclear powers. Starting in the 1980s, however, a range of mechanisms led to an emerging system of mutual inspections that transformed geopolitics in South America, defused threat perceptions, helped the civilian leadership extricate the military from the nuclear programs, and paved the way for entry into the NPT.
Webcast

A Long Goodbye: The Soviet Withdrawal from Afghanistan

May 26, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
The current conflict in Afghanistan looms large in the collective consciousness of Americans. What has the United States achieved, and how will it withdraw without sacrificing those gains? Artemy Kalinovsky's latest book entitled A Long Goodbye: The Soviet Withdrawal from Afghanistan discusses how the Soviet Union confronted these same questions in the 1980s, and how the USSR's nine-year struggle to extricate itself from Afghanistan and bring its troops home provides a sobering perspective on exit options in the region.
Webcast

Death and Redemption: The Gulag and the Shaping of Soviet Society

May 19, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Death and Redemption examines the Gulag's role defining the border between reintegration into society and permanent removal through death. Steven Barnes focuses on Kazakhstan's Karaganda region, a location that hosted a number of Soviet detention institutions, and suggests that the Gulag should be construed as a "corrective facility," which gave its occupants a final chance to prove themselves through forced labor. Those who succeeded returned home after years of brutal, forced labor; the ones who "failed" died. Barnes traces the evolution of the Gulag from its origins post-1917, immediately following the Russian Revolution up to the death of Stalin in 1953. The author draws on recently declassified materials from Russia and Kazakhstan, including memoirs of survivors, to show that the Gulag as an institution remained closely linked to the Soviet idea of creating an utopian socialist society.

Pages

Upcoming Events

Experts & Staff