Events

The Bush Administration's Decision for War in Iraq, 2003

April 27, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Wilson Center Public Policy Scholar Melvyn P. Leffler will review prevailing interpretations and suggest how his current research may refine our understanding of the decision to intervene militarily in Iraq in 2003.
Webcast

The Soviet Bloc as a Project of Globalization

April 21, 2011 // 12:00pm1:30pm
During a discussion held at the Wilson Center, Elidor Mëhilli argued that economic cooperation within the Soviet bloc should be viewed as a project of globalization characterized by intellectual and technical exchanges and implicit competition with the west. Mëhilli, a doctoral candidate in European and Eurasian history at Princeton University, focused on Albania, calling the small country in Southeast Europe an important laboratory for the "socialist experiment" and a useful case study to understand the nature of socialist exchange.

The Variable Impact of EU Conditionality: Differentiated Reforms in the Entities of Bosnia and Herzegovina

April 20, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Since the Dayton Peace Accord was signed 16 years ago, the European Union (EU) has been actively involved in Bosnia and Herzegovina in various capacities and has created a number of local institutions to support its four current missions. At the same time, the complicated state institutional structure in Bosnia means that the EU must simultaneously interact with a number of local and state-level institutions. Mujo Hadzic discussed a central puzzle: Does EU conditionality work in such a complex environment? Given this institutional complexity, Hadzic argued, both the Bosnian government and the EU struggle to speak with one voice, which dilutes the EU's impact and diffuses the energies of Bosnian institutions.
Webcast

The OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities: The Role in Conflict Prevention

April 13, 2011 // 2:00pm3:00pm
The fundamental changes after the collapse of the Soviet Union and the break-up of Yugoslavia required new approaches to international security, including the ability to prevent possible inter-ethnic tensions within and between states from developing into conflict. For almost two decades, the High Commissioner on National Minorities (HCNM) has been active in conflict prevention based on the mandate established by OSCE participating states to provide early warning and early action in situations of tension involving national minority issues, if in the judgment of the High Commissioner these have the potential of developing into conflict, affecting pace, stability and relations between participating states.
Webcast

Reluctant Accomplice: "Good Germans" in the War of Annihilation, 1939-1942

April 07, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Konrad H. Jarausch, Lurcy Professor of European Civilization, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill will discuss his latest book entitled Reluctant Accomplice: "Good Germans" in the War of Annihilation, 1939-1942. Comprised of wartime letters written by Jarausch's father, Konrad Jarausch, a German high-school teacher of religion and history who served in a reserve battalion of Hitler's army in Poland and Russia. The book brings the letters together to tell the gripping story of a patriotic soldier of the Third Reich who, through witnessing its atrocities in the East, begins to doubt the war's moral legitimacy.
Webcast

Warsaw Pact: Wartime Statutes—Instruments of Soviet Control

April 05, 2011 // 1:00pm4:30pm
A collection of recently declassified Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) documents demonstrates that in the early 1980s the U.S. government learned quickly of new Warsaw Pact planning instruments and accurately assessed the role that the Soviet Union's Warsaw Pact allies were expected to play in a conflict in Europe.
Webcast

American Biography After the Cold War

April 04, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
What are the issues of judgment, perspective, and stance that confront historians whose subjects played a role in debates about Stalinism, McCarthyism, and Communism? In the years when the Cold War shaped perceptions, historians identified themselves with particular political positions. But what is the view toward such issues today? Is the intellectual Cold War over? Or does it still constrain our minds and our words? Lillian Hellman will serve as a case in point in this presentation with Columbia University R. Gordon Hoxie Professor of American History Alice Kessler-Harris.
Webcast

Ruth Fischer: A Life For and Against Communism, 1895-1961

March 24, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Mario Kessler, associate professor at the University of Potsdam, Germany will discuss Ruth Fischer's political itinerary and attempt to explain why it went to such extremes – astonishing even in the ‘Age of Extremes.'

Why There Is (Almost) No Post-Communist Christian Democracy

March 23, 2011 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Compared to their West European cousins, post-communist Christian Democratic parties are notable for their lack of success.
Webcast

Solidarity With Solidarity: Western European Trade Unions and the Polish Crisis, 1980-1982

March 11, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
On March 11, 2011 Idesbald Goddeeris will discuss his latest book which analyzes reaction to Solidarnosc in nine Western European countries and within the international trade union confederations.

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