Events

Ukraine After the Election: Only a First Step

For Ukraine, May 25th was an important milestone, with elections as free and fair as one could have possibly hoped for under extremely challenging circumstances. But the long path to stabilize and reform Ukraine is just beginning, right now, after the election, writes Wolfgang Ischinger.

The Variable Geometries of Turkey's European Integration

November 2007 - This article is a revised and updated version of the author's "Variable Geometries: Institutions, Power and Ideas in Turkey's European Integration process" in Noel Parker (ed.): The Geopolitics of Europe's Boundaries: Spaces, centres and Margins, (forthcoming, Palgrave).

17. National Identity and Cultural Politics under Ceausescu: An Example from Philosophy

This author's objective is to investigate how intellectual activity in Romania under Ceausescu contributed to reproducing an ideology in which "the nation" had pride of place. Much as had occurred in the period between the two World Wars, Romanian intellectuals debating with one another helped to strengthen a national ideology; their actions, and not simply Ceausescu's much-invoked "manipulation of nationalism to promote legitimacy" contributed to fortifying the idea of the nation and undermining the discourse of Marxism-Leninism on which Romania's socialist system supposedly rested.

The Cyprus Referendum Election

Television interview with John Sitilides, CNN-Turk

Wilson Center Launches Global Europe Program

The Wilson Center launches new Global Europe program, which focuses on Europe’s external challenges and opportunities. On occasion of the launch, the Center's President and CEO Jane Harman will host a public discussion with Catherine Ashton, High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy.

156. Two Worlds of Arms Control, Two Visions of Europe

March 1998 - The new millennium will begin without a consensus among world leaders on the direction or importance of arms control. This being the case, two scenarios exsist that US policy makers must take into account. The first is tha the quantitative dimension of arms control will disappear. With the collapse of the Soviet Union, the superpower-driven urgency of arms control (which made for high politics at U.S.-Soviet summits) will be replaced by efforts to implement and verify exsisting treaties: START I and II, the Chemical Weapons Convention, and perhaps a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (if the Senate ratifies it in 1998 or 1999). "Free market arms control" will become the norm; additional reductions or impose tighter verification regimes will be regarded as too expensive to implement. Quantitative arms control may not be an issues in any case, since rising social and financial costs dictate downsizing forces and discarding weapons.

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Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Kristina N. Terzieva // Program Assistant
  • Emily R. Buss // Program Assistant