Events

157. Reflections on The "Elegant Takeover" of Czechoslovakia

March 1998 - With the end of the Cold War, we have been given the opportunity not only to research in archives hitherto inaccessible but also to rethink aspects of East European history freed from the ideological preconceptions carried in that struggle. In this regard, and particularly in light of Eastern Europe's search for a usable past, the question of the postwar slide into communist dictatorship seems ripe for rethinking. The fact is that there were significant elements in each society of the region that were in favor of the communist "solution" to the problems of postwar reorganization and reconstruction, and many more amenable to that solution.

Culture Shutdown? A Plea for Museums, Galleries, and Libraries in Bosnia and Herzegovina

"... in a matter of weeks or months, seven of Bosnia’s top national cultural institutions were likely to close their doors," wrote Susan C. Pearce, an East European Studies Title VIII-supported scholar, in an article discussing the challenges that historical preservation institutions in Bosnia and Herzegovina face today.

239. Loyalty Amidst Treachery: Austrian-Hungarian Relations, 1955-1956

October 2001- During October 1956, Hungarians reached out to join the West and found that, by intent and purpose, they were alone. Even the international community appeared to have abandoned their call for freedom. By the second invasion of the Red Army on November 4, the Hungarians seemed to stand alone, refugees in their own country. Yet throughout the fight, the Austrians remained loyal to their historic neighbors and the ideals that drove the uprising.
Gabor Demszky--Former Mayor of Budapest

Uncertainties and Inequalities: Post-communist transformation of Budapest

Following the collapse of communist systems in East Europe, cities and nations confronted the task of introducing markets and democratically accountable political systems. In other words, they needed to establish economic and governing mechanisms empowering individuals. They needed, as a popular metaphor of the time expressed the challenge, “to make an aquarium out of fish stew.”

320. The International Community's Response to the Yugoslav Crisis: 1989-1995

January 2006 - What role did the international community play in the Yugoslav crisis in the first half of the 1990s? Could the bloody demise of Yugoslavia have been prevented, if the international community had reacted sooner? On the basis of current literature, the role of international organizations (the UN, NATO, OSCE, EC/EU, WEU), key world powers (USA, Germany, Soviet Union/Russia, Great Britain, France), the standpoints of the non-aligned countries, smaller countries of EC/EU (especially Greece) and other neighboring countries of former Yugoslavia will be considered here.

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Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Kristina N. Terzieva // Program Assistant
  • Emily R. Buss // Program Assistant