Events

European Union Enlargement: Pushing the Frontiers of Cooperation

In May 2004, the European Union accepted 10 new countries, raising the total from 15 to 25 member states, with a combined population of 454 million people. The addition of eight East/Central European nations is a milestone in the EU's plan to integrate Western Europe with the formerly communist world, a plan that was in the making since 1989 when communism fell and an unprecedented opportunity arose to broaden the boundaries of democracy.

132. Serbia At Political Crossroads

October 1997 - The expansion of NATO is nothing new. NATO has enlarged itself several times in the past, most recently absorbing the G.D.R. (through the back door of the G.D.R.'s incorporation into one Germany). But the currently envisioned expansion is different from previous ones: this enlargement is primarily politically motivated and it is about the future shape of Europe. The foremost political challenge on the continent after the Cold War is the integration into European organizations of the countries previously included in the Soviet bloc, and NATO has stepped up to this challenge as part of its transformation. If the NATO-Russia Council is successful and NATO's relations with Russia develop along a constructive path, then the alliance's eastward enlargement has the potential to accelerate the integration of Central European countries into a Euro-Atlantic community in a manner that erases the animosities that caused armed conflict in the past.

Distinguished Scholar Ambassador Wolfgang Ischinger Interviewed about Ukraine

Wilson Center Distinguished Scholar Wolfgang Ischinger – Chairman of the Munich Security Conference, and former German Ambassador to the United States – appeared on the Charlie Rose Show on June 25 to discuss the ongoing tensions in Ukraine.

217. Bosnia and Bulgaria: Crossroads for Two Economic Transitions

October 2000- Bosnia-Herzegovina and Bulgaria share more than a common border with Serbia. Both of their disparate governments are engaged in a common enterprise, which if unsuccessful, will render their proper connection to Europe, their democratic prospects, and indeed their very survival unlikely. That common enterprise is not "nation-building," understood across Southeastern Europe to mean the construction of nation-states on the basis of the respective ethnic majority. Such ethnic states override the rights of individuals or ethnic minorities.

Broaden the German-U.S. Dialogue About Snooping

Trust needs to be rebuilt between the United States and Germany, writes Jane Harman and Volker Perthes. As allies and democracies, the U.S. and Germany can do this, with some imagination and effort, and the relationship can be improved as a result. Here's how.

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Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Kristina N. Terzieva // Program Assistant
  • Emily R. Buss // Program Assistant