Events

How Turkey’s Islamists Fell out of love with Iran: The Near Future of Turkish-Iranian Relations

April 23, 2013 // 3:00pm4:00pm
After the 1979 revolution, Iran’s Islamist regime emerged as the clear anti-thesis of a secular Turkey and two countries’ relationship was only sustained by political Islamists on both sides. According to Akin Unver, this 1979-2010 Islamist connection is also being reversed by the sectarian faultlines unearthed by the Arab Spring. Iran’s rapid fall from grace with Turkish Islamists is one of the most important recent structural shifts in the Middle East, Unver suggests. Such a break is far from marginal and yields several important points for consideration.

A Muslim Tale of Two Cities: ‘We Met the Trains’

April 10, 2013 // 2:30pm3:30pm
The forced migration of Muslims from the Balkans to Turkey is one of the least known movements of people in modern times. In "A Muslim Tale of Two Cities" Frances Trix focuses on urban Muslims from the central Balkans and the hometown associations they founded in Turkish cities.

The Power of Weak States in International Politics: Eastern Europe in the 20th Century

April 04, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
"Weak states can be both policy takers and, occasionally, policy makers," argues Laszlo Borhi in a presentation examining weak states in East Central Europe in the 20th century. Focusing on several case studies, Borhi looks at three periods: the aftermath of World War I and World War II and the post-1989 era.

The Third Side of the Cold War: Movement of the Non-aligned States, Yugoslavia and the World

April 03, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
Drawing on the private document collections of two former Yugoslav ministers of foreign affairs, Tvrtko Jakovina renders an account of Tito's last years in office and the role Yugoslavia played as the leader of the Movement of the Non-aligned Countries from 1960s until 1990s.

The Sandzak Divided: Language and Identity Politics on Either Side of the New Serbian/Montenegrin Border

March 28, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
In the post-Yugoslav context, members of these Muslim communities have largely self-identified as Bosniaks, an ethnic/national term that gained prominence among Bosnian Muslims in the period immediately following the dissolution of Yugoslavia in 1991 and the outbreak of the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. While language policies in this region were centrally formulated in the joint state, with the dissolution of the Republic of Serbia and Montenegro in 2006, the two halves of the Sandžak experienced divergent language policies. In his presentation, Robert Greenberg, professor of linguistics at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, argues that the division of the Sandžak may have been a catalyst for destabilizing and radicalized forces to emerge in the years following the formal Serbia/Montenegro split.

1989 After 1989: Memory in Transition in Central and Eastern Europe

March 14, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
The eastern European revolutions of 1989 were a watershed in global history. Despite this, in the two decades since, their meaning has become a source of debate. While they have been promoted as a founding myth for a newly unified Europe, eastern Europeans have repeatedly represented them as a moment of betrayal, martyrdom, liberation, victory, disappointment, loss, colonization, or nostalgia.
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Stalin’s Curse: Battling for Communism in War and Cold War

March 05, 2013 // 12:00pm1:00pm
"Exciting, deeply engaged, and shrewdly perceptive, Stalin's Curse is an unprecedented revelation of the sinister machinations of Stalin's Kremlin." Based on newly declassified archival materials author Robert Gellately offers a more clearly defined picture of what went on behind the scenes.
Webcast

On the Edge of the Cold War: American Diplomats and Spies in Postwar Europe

January 23, 2013 // 12:00pm1:30pm
Drawing on archival documents and testimonies of high-ranking American diplomats and intelligence officers, "On the Edge of the Cold War" explores the postwar political crisis in former Czechoslovakia from the perspective of the U.S. Embassy under Laurence Steinhardt and of U.S. Intelligence under Charles Katek and Spencer Taggart. The book paints a critical portrait of Ambassador Steinhardt, and shows that his groundless optimism caused Washington to ignore signs that democracy in Czechoslovakia was in trouble.
Webcast

U.S. Foreign Policy – A Time to Stop Drifting? A British Perspective

January 15, 2013 // 9:30am10:30am
Offering a European perspective on U.S. foreign policy, Lord Lothian - Member of the House of Lords and former UK Member of Parliamen - will focus on the global effect of the pivot to the Asia-Pacific region. The discussion will touch upon the implications this may have for the future of the Euro-Atlantic relationship in the context of the volatile state of world affairs.

Is Europe facing a new Era? The Treaty on Stability and the Struggle for Economic Sovereignty in a Political Perspective

December 06, 2012 // 3:00pm4:00pm
The current European crisis is not only the crisis of a single country or the crisis of a small group of countries; this crisis is structural. It is not a crisis similar to the 1929 crisis, or similar to the crisis of the 70s. To face it the European Union (without the United Kingdom) has agreed to sign a Treaty on Stability, which is intended to provide economic measures to reduce public debt and to control public finance. This system, however, has a critical weakness: it perpetuates the gap existing between a fully integrated economic system and independent political decision making on the part of EU member states.

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Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Kristina N. Terzieva // Program Assistant
  • Emily R. Buss // Program Assistant