Events

Webcast

The 'Good Occupation': Military Government in the American Imagination

March 14, 2011 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Military occupation has been a crucial dimension of U.S. foreign relations from the early nineteenth century to the present. The occupations of Germany and Japan in the wake of the Second World War generally were regarded positively. The occupation of Iraq, which initially met with some approbation, eventually tarnished the reputation of the George W. Bush administration. Wilson Center fellow Susan L. Carruthers will explain the transformation of public attitude.
Webcast

Solidarity With Solidarity: Western European Trade Unions and the Polish Crisis, 1980-1982

March 11, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
On March 11, 2011 Idesbald Goddeeris will discuss his latest book which analyzes reaction to Solidarnosc in nine Western European countries and within the international trade union confederations.

Greece's Financial Crisis and the Future of the Euro

March 11, 2011 // 9:00am10:30am
Petros G. Doukas, Head of Capital Partners S.A. and former Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs for the Hellenic Republic
Webcast

Russia's Cold War: From the October Revolution to the Fall of the Wall

March 10, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
In his latest book Jonathan Haslam makes the case that the Cold War was not stable, but was characterized by constant wars, near-wars, and political upheavals on both sides.
Webcast

Rethinking the History of the French Welfare State

March 07, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
This seminar will delineate the French welfare state in long-term historical perspective and consider the multiple strands of tradition, institutions, and policies that contributed to its founding and development. It will link practices to successive political regimes and make comparisons between French and British welfare systems. What are the possible future directions of French welfare policy in view of past precedents and current conditions?

Turkey's Regional Perspectives on Eurasia and East Asia

March 01, 2011 // 10:30am11:45am
"The post-Cold War era notion of security can no longer be confined to merely military terms," according to Ambassador Fatih Ceylan, but factors such as historical, cultural and economic ties increasingly forge a role in developing greater political will and cooperation among neighboring countries.

In Search of 'La Chose Franco-Arab'

February 28, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
From the eighteenth century until the present, the multitude of French-Arab relationships, positive or negative, constitute what one can call, according to the famous expression of Jacques Berque, "la chose franco-arabe" ("the French-Arab thing"). This seminar will define its history and consequently its nature—and what its future might be.

Egypt and the Middle East: A Turkish Model of Democracy?

February 25, 2011 // 9:00am10:30am
Recent political unrest in the Middle East has prompted a debate about whether Turkey, a transitioning democracy with Islamic roots, can serve as a model for political transformation in the Arab world. The panelists highlighted the distinctiveness of the "Turkish model" of governance and raised doubts about its potential to inform the political discourse in the revolting Middle East.
Webcast

Work in Progress Presentation: U.S. Policy Toward Trade Liberalization, Sino-American Economic Relations, and China's Road to "Reform and Opening," 1969-1976

February 17, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
On April 14th, 1971, President Richard Nixon announced an end to the U.S.-led embargo on the People's Republic of China, a step which marked the beginning of Sino-American economic normalization and a new direction for U.S. foreign policy despite the absence of diplomatic relations with Beijing. During a work in progress presentation, Wilson Center Public Policy Scholar Dai Chaowu assessed the U.S. policy toward trade liberalization as an important element in Nixon's diplomacy and as a critical means of turning détente into a practical reality.
Webcast

Churchill's Cold War Revisited

February 14, 2011 // 3:00pm4:30pm
Winston Churchill's 1946 "iron curtain" speech was the opening shot in the Cold War for Stalin, Khrushchev, and most other Soviet leaders. Churchill's summit diplomacy of the years 1953–55, however, called for German unification on the basis of neutrality and the peaceful end of the East-West conflict. How can this apparent contradiction be explained? What were Churchill's motives? Klaus Larres revisits these issues and argues that Churchill's policies were coherent and made contributions toward possible solutions in a creative way.

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Upcoming Events

Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Pieter Biersteker // Editorial Assistant
  • Laura Deal // Catalog Specialist
  • Charles Kraus // Program Associate
  • Evan Pikulski // Program Assistant
  • James Person // Deputy Director, History and Public Policy Program; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project