Events

The Other Welfare: Supplemental Security Income and U.S. Social Policy

November 04, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Supplemental Security Income, passed in 1972 during an innovative and expansive phase of the American welfare state, marked an effort to do welfare right. But economic and political circumstances, as well as the contingencies of the moment, all combined to turn the program into a source of controversy over such things as whether parents coached their children to act “crazy” in an effort to secure benefits or whether immigrants deserved benefits.

The Family Jewels Then and Now

October 28, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
The famous 1970s investigations of the Central Intelligence Agency conducted by the Church Committee and others followed leaks of information from the intelligence agencies revealing activities that were illegal or abusive under the CIA’s charter. The CIA secretly compiled a document known as “The Family Jewels” detailing the abuses. This season of inquiry resulted in the intelligence oversight system that exists today. Now a fresh set of leaks confronts Americans, revealing widespread eavesdropping by the National Security Agency. What is the proper response to these revelations?

Indonesia and the World, 1965-66

October 21, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Pro-communist coup, military counter-coup, and subsequent mass killings in Indonesia in 1965/66 represent one of the major dramas of the Cold War. The powerful domestic impact of those events continues to haunt Indonesia until today, while the role of foreign actors remains largely hidden. Basing their talk on the first international academic conference held on this subject on Indonesian territory (in 2011), the speakers will introduce their edited book, Indonesia and the World, 1965-66, discuss international complicities, and address the current state of debate.

Revolutionary Mosquitoes: Malaria, Yellow Fever, and Independence in the Americas, 1776-1825

October 07, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
John McNeill argues that yellow fever and malaria, both mosquito-borne diseases, helped make the Americas free. In the campaigns of 1780-81 in the Carolinas and Virginia, in the Haitian Revolution of 1791-1804, in the wars of independence in the Spanish Americas of 1808-25, locally born and raised soldiers and militia enjoyed a strong advantage over European troops in terms of their resistance to these two infections. Did disease tip the military balance?

Strategy: A History

October 01, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
In Strategy: A History, Sir Lawrence Freedman, one of the world's leading authorities on war and international politics, captures the vast history of strategic thinking, in a consistently engaging and insightful account of how strategy came to pervade every aspect of our lives.

Latin America Encounters Nelson Rockefeller: Imagining the Gringo Patrón in 1969

September 30, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
In 1969, Nelson Rockefeller embarked on four ill-fated diplomatic tours of Latin America that inspired violent clashes between the state and the street. Contemporary observers and subsequent scholars have dismissed Gov. Rockefeller's goodwill effort as an unmitigated failure. In this talk, Ernesto Capello explores recently released documents, including selections from the thousands of solicitations sent to Rockefeller by ordinary citizens, which demonstrate the need to reevaluate Rockefeller's Presidential Mission as a critical moment in the way Cold War Latin America imagined its neighbors to the north.

The Accidental Victim: JFK, Lee Harvey Oswald, and the Real Target in Dallas

September 26, 2013 // 12:00pm1:30pm
Wilson Center Senior Scholar James Reston, Jr. discusses his new book on the Kennedy assassination.

The Worlds of Joseph Conrad

September 23, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
What does it feel like to live in a world transformed by new technology, new ideas, and new dynamics of world power? A century ago, the author Joseph Conrad provided vivid answers to questions we still ask today. In his novels Heart of Darkness (1899), Lord Jim (1900), Nostromo (1904), and The Secret Agent (1907) – each set on a different continent, each anchored in historical incidents and in personal experience – Conrad revealed the forces challenging European dominance, and anticipated the defining currents of the twentieth century.

Investing in Indebtedness: World History and Impoverishment in Africa

September 16, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Modern Africa's impoverishment, though often alleged to have begun in the era of slaving, deepened during colonial rule, barely paused during the early years of national independence, intensified with the Cold War era of military rule, and – recently – provoked painful structural adjustment programs, has in fact been at the core of the continent’s relationship with the commercial economies surrounding it for a millennium and may reveal as much about world economies as about Africa itself.
Webcast

More than Just a Scourge: General de Gaulle and the Cold War

September 09, 2013 // 4:00pm5:30pm
General de Gaulle is often remembered as the great scourge of the Western Alliance during the 1960s, the mercurial French President who launched a global and comprehensive challenge against the United States’ leadership of the Free World. But de Gaulle was driven by more than simply obstructionism or a desire to make life difficult for his American allies. Garret Martin will make the case that the General pursued an ambitious, if flawed, grand strategy during the 1960s through which he sought to overcome the Cold War bipolar order.

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