International Security Studies

Events

Latest US Nuclear Strategy Calls for Fewer, but Newer, Nuke Weapons

A recently released report, National Security and Nuclear Weapons in the 21st Century, outlines a strategy that the US secretaries of Defense and Energy believe will allow the US to maintain a small but effective nuclear force. Wilson Center Public Policy Scholar William Eldridge comments on the strategy.

Constrainment: A Counterterrorism Strategy for the Post-Iraq Era

The global jihadist movement will ultimately self-destruct, argued Public Policy Scholar Stephanie Kaplan at the latest event in International Security Studies' ongoing Terrorism and Homeland Security Forum. To catalyze this implosion, the U.S. must constrain the movement's operations and narrative.
Outlier States: American Strategies to Change, Contain, or Engage Regimes by Robert S. Litwak

Outlier States: American Strategies to Change, Contain, or Engage Regimes

In the Bush era, Iran and North Korea were branded “rogue” states, and changing their regimes was the administration’s goal. The Obama administration has chosen instead to call the countries nuclear “outliers” and has proposed means other than regime change to bring them back into the fold, Outlier States, the successor to Litwak’s Regime Change: U.S. Strategy through the Prism of 9/11 (2007), explores this significant policy adjustment and raises questions about its feasibility and its possible consequences.
Robert Litwak on Context

How Serious are North Korea’s Nuclear Threats?

How much do we really know about North Korea’s nuclear capabilities and ability to attack the U.S. and its allies? To explore these questions and more, we spoke with the Wilson Center’s resident expert on nuclear-powered “outlier states,” Robert Litwak.

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Experts & Staff

  • Robert S. Litwak // Vice President for Scholars and Academic Relations and Director, International Security Studies
  • Tonya Boyce // Program Assistant, International Security Studies