International Security Studies

Events

The Least Worst Place: Guantanamo's First 100 Days

Much has been written about policymaking during the first 100 days of the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo, but little is known about what happened on the ground in Cuba. As part of International Security Studies' ongoing Terrorism and Homeland Security Forum, author Karen Greenberg discusses her book on that period.

Nuclear Weapons in International Politics: It's Getting Personal

The role that nuclear weapons play in international politics and security is evolving. For wealthy, militarily powerful countries, nuclear weapons are playing a diminishing role in security planning. Conversely, some countries that lack advanced military capabilities may be coming to see nuclear weapons as increasingly important for their security. The differences between these two groups are reinforced by the fact that, over the past decade, two dictators who ended their nuclear programs have lost their regimes and their lives. As a result, authoritarian leaders may now have an increasingly personal interest in holding on to their nuclear ambitions. U.S. interests can be advanced by minimizing the association that has developed over the past decade between ending nuclear weapons programs, ending regimes, and ending authoritarian leaders’ lives.
Rogue States and U.S. Foreign Policy: Containment after the Cold War by Robert S. Litwak

Rogue States and U.S. Foreign Policy: Containment after the Cold War

Robert Litwak traces the origins and development of rogue state policy and then assesses its efficacy through detailed case studies of Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. In place of a generic and constricting strategy, he argues for the development of "differentiated" strategies of containment, tailored to the particular circumstances within individual states.

Debating Iran's Nuclear Aspirations

This article appeared in the Autumn 2003 issue of The Washington Quarterly.

U.S. Energy Security Policy: A Global Perspective

Making sure markets are open, fair, and transparent is a key tenet of the Obama administration's global energy security agenda. At a January 11 Director's Forum, State Department special envoy David Goldwyn outlined the United States' plan for energy security policy.

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Experts & Staff

  • Robert S. Litwak // Vice President for Scholars and Academic Relations and Director, International Security Studies
  • Tonya Boyce // Program Assistant, International Security Studies