Events

Thoughts on Strategy from a Career Ambassador

Both Washington and Beijing consider good bilateral relations of vital importance. But their growing strategic rivalry has the potential to evolve into mutual antagonism. The hard reality is that China and the United States will not be able to lessen strategic mistrust unless and until they are prepared to address a central question: is there an array of military deployments and normal operations that will permit China to defend its core interests while allowing America to continue fully to meet its defense responsibilities in the region and protect vital U.S. interests?

Managing U.S.-China Relations

Kissinger Institute Director Stapleton Roy discusses top priorities in the U.S.-China bilateral relationship, from cooperation toward reversing the global financial crisis to addressing climate change.

China and Japan REALLY Don’t Like Each Other

A recent survey of Chinese and Japanese citizens views of each other’s countries found that 92.8 percent of Chinese respondents hold unfavorable views of Japan, a startling 28 percent rise from the year before. Similarly, 90.1 percent of respondents in Japan had an unfavorable or relatively unfavorable view of China, compared with 84.3 percent last year. For both countries, these figures were higher than in the previous nine annual surveys conducted.

Can Cooperation Overcome Mistrust In U.S.-China Relationship?

Strategic mistrust between the U.S. and China is escalating, overshadowing their shared interests, says Ambassador J. Stapleton Roy. Vice President Xi Jinping’s visit will not produce immediate results but provides the two countries an opportunity to gain control of their relationship.

Comparative Research on Government Organization and Operation, 2009 Washington Symposium

The Kissinger Institute and the Counselors' Office of the State Council of the People's Republic of China (PRC) held a joint symposium to explore and compare governance topics in both the People's Republic of China and the United States.

Not Rising, But Rejuvenating: The "Chinese Dream"

Many talk of China "rising." Chinese view their fortunes as a return to greatness from a "century of humiliation" -- and not a rise from nothing.

Sustaining U.S.-China Cooperation in Clean Energy

Sustaining U.S.-China Cooperation in Clean Energy (Wilson Center Publication) provides a governmental and private-sector overview of the complex dynamics of competition and cooperation behind U.S. and Chinese national efforts to develop their solar, wind, and other alternative energy industries.

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