Events

Local Governance and the Creation of Spaces for Civic Action

March 10, 2005 // 8:00am1:00pm
Join us for a discussion of an Inter-American Foundation-funded study of local governance and the creation of public spaces for citizen action. Presenters will discuss examples of grassroots participation in Peru, Ecuador, and Brazil.

Prisons in Crisis

February 15, 2005 // 1:00pm4:00pm
The Prisons In Crisis Project brings together officials, activists, and specialists working on prison reform in Latin America in order to highlight common problems faced by the region's prison systems and to develop policies to address them.

The OAS: Chile's Vision

January 31, 2005 // 9:30am10:30am
A Director's Forum with His Excellency José Miguel Insulza, Minister of the Interior of Chile. Webcast available for viewing. See the "See Also" section of the Event Summary webpage.

Crucial Needs, Weak Incentives Book Launch

January 12, 2005 // 3:30am5:00pm
On Wednesday, January 12th, 2005, the Latin American Program hosted the book launch of Crucial Needs, Weak Incentives: Social Sector Reform, Democratization, and Globalization in Latin America, edited by Robert R. Kaufman and Joan M. Nelson. This book emerged from a series of workshops that are part of the Latin America Program's ongoing examination of social sector policies and reform in Latin America.For more information about the book, see our Wilson Press webpage.
Webcast

Book Launch--Beyond Free and Fair: Monitoring Elections and Building Democracy

December 09, 2004 // 2:30pm4:30pm
Eric Bjornlund, Democracy International; Commentator: Thomas Carothers, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Video of this event is available here.

The Role of the Media in the Consolidation of Democracy

November 15, 2004 // 8:00am1:00pm
This conference, co-sponsored by the Woodrow Wilson Center's Latin American Program and the Office of the Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression from the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, examined the role that the media play during Latin American countries' transitions to democracy, as well as new challenges that the media are now confronting in their relationships with the public and democratic governments.

The Study of New Democracies in Latin America and Elsewhere: Reflections on the 25th Anniversary of the "Transitions Project" at the Woodrow Wilson Center

October 01, 2004 // 9:30am12:30pm
Twenty-five years ago at the Wilson Center, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Guillermo O'Donnell, Philippe Schmitter, and Laurence Whitehead, with support from Abraham Lowenthal, who was then director of the Latin American Program, organized a project to consider the transitions from authoritarian regimes in Latin America and Europe. The Transitions Project was at the origin of almost twenty-five years of conceptual debate and empirical research on regime change and democratic governance throughout the world; it is time to take stock of what we have learned from this experience. It is our pleasure to invite you to a session on "The Study of New Democracies in Latin America and Elsewhere: Reflections on the 25th Anniversary of the ‘Transitions Project' at the Woodrow Wilson Center" featuring the three project co-directors and the then director of the Wilson Center's Latin American Program.

The Peace Process in Colombia with the Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia-AUC

June 28, 2004 // 11:00am5:30pm
In July 2003, the government of President Álvaro Uribe took the unprecedented step of opening formal peace talks with the AUC. Although close to 900 paramilitary fighters demobilized last year, issues such as paramilitary involvement in drug trafficking and accountability for human rights abuses have raised controversy in Colombia and abroad. The Wilson Center conference aims to explore key issues in the Government-AUC peace talks, the prospects for an eventual negotiated settlement, and the key challenges ahead. Video of both the Director's Forum and the Panel discussion is available here. Summaries of both the Director's Forum and the Panel discussion are available in the Summary section.

Social and Economic Dimensions of Conflict and Peace in Colombia

May 13, 2004 // 12:30pm2:30pm
During 2003, both the World Bank and the United Nations Development Program published major studies of economic and social conditions in Colombia and the causes and consequences of conflict, including policy recommendations for sustainable and equitable growth and development as well as reform. The World Bank's 900-plus page study, Colombia: The Economic Foundation of Peace, and the United Nations Development Program's human development report, El conflicto: callejón con salida, offer comprehensive diagnoses of the relationship between violence and civil conflict, detailing, among other issues, the human costs of the war, the crisis of the rural sector, and offering recommendations for macroeconomic and social policy reform.

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