Events

How to Aid Venezuela

Juan Gabriel Tokatlian, Director of the Department of Political Science and International Studies at the Universidad Di Tella, Buenos Aires, Argentina, writes on the crisis in Venezuela.

In Their Own Words:
United States Presidential Candidates on Latin America

In light of the unparalleled interest around the world in the outcome of the 2008 U. S. presidential election, the staff of the Woodrow Wilson Center's Latin American Program has prepared a collection of policy statements from the campaigns of Senators John McCain and Barack Obama on a series of topics relevant to Latin America. This compendium covers the following topics: Free Trade and Development; The War on Drugs and Hemispheric Security; Human Rights; Mexico; Immigration; Democratic Governance, Populism, and the "New Left"; and Cuba. Latin American Program staff have written brief introductions for each topic. The document then includes relevant excerpts from debates, interviews, official policy statements, articles, etc. Wherever possible, we have provided a link to the original statement. We will continue to update this collection throughout the remaining weeks of the presidential campaign.

Latin American Program in the News: Admite Costa Rica que capos de México y Colombia usan su territorio

The Latin America Program's event, "The Transnational Nature of Organized Crime in the Americas” was discussed in this article about Mexican and Colombian cartels entering Costa Rica. (In Spanish)

Latin American Program in the News: La mujer que perforó la impunidad en Guatemala

Wilson Center Scholar, Juan Carlos Garzón, is quoted in an article on 180.com about the judicial changes that have occurred under Guatemalan Attorney General, Claudia Paz y Paz. The article analyzes whether the changes that have been made will continue once Paz y Paz steps down at the end of 2014. This article is in Spanish.

Latin American Program in the News: FARC defense of kidnappings agitates negotiations

Enrique Santos, at a forum at the Wilson Center, explained that the lack of movement on the first point of the peace process agenda, agrarian reform, could dampen the enthusiasm of the Colombian and international communities. (In Spanish)

Interests, Institutions, and Reformers: The Politics of Education Decentralization in Mexico

This paper uses Mexico as a case for exploring the introduction of education reform in a hostile political environment.

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