Events

Latin American Program in the News: What Does 'American' Actually Mean?

In Latin America, "American" means anyone from the American continent. U.S. citizens claiming the word are considered gauche or imperialist. So what's the solution?

Peruzzotti, Enrique, "Argentina after the Crash: Pride and Disillusion", Current History Journal, February 2004.

Argentine democracy appears to be weathering its most serious challenge since 1983 with relative success. The political and economic crisis has not led to the collapse of democratic institutions or prompted calls for authoritarianism."

Decentralization and Democratic Governance in Latin America

This volume explores one of the crucial intersections of political and economic change: how the reform of the central state in the form of policies of decentralization has affected democratic governance in different countries and at different levels of society.The book is a product of a two-year project on decentralization which included both national-level and comparative research.

Latin American Program in the News: Debilidad institucional vulnera guerra contra narcotráfico en Honduras

The Latin American Program was mentioned for its publication of "Organizaciones de Tráfico de drogas en Centroamérica: Transportistas, Carteles Mexicanos y Maras," which identified the nexus between the Sinaloa Cartel and criminal organizations within Honduras. (In Spanish)

Beyond the Current Crisis: The Big Picture in Venezuela

Demonstrators in Venezuela blame President Nicolás Maduro for "mismanaging" the economy of the oil-rich country and have said they will continue protesting until he resigns. But problems such as lack of security, high crime rates, and frustration with the country's poor economic situation did not begin when Maduro took office. In this edition of CONTEXT, Margarita López Maya looks at the big picture in Venezuela. How did it get to this point and what will it take to solve problems that have persisted for many years?

Former President of Brazil Visits Wilson Center

On December 6 Fernando Henrique Cardoso spoke to commemorate the 25th Anniversary of the Transitions from Authoritarian Rule Project at the Wilson Center.
In the Wake of War: Democratization and Internal Armed Conflict in Latin America, edited by Cynthia J. Arnson

In the Wake of War: Democratization and Internal Armed Conflict in Latin America

In the Wake of War assesses the consequences of civil war for democratization in Latin America, focusing on questions of state capacity. Contributors focus on seven countries—Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru—where state weakness fostered conflict and the task of state reconstruction presents multiple challenges. 

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