Events

Woodrow Wilson Center Mexico Institute and the University of San Diego's Trans-Border Institute Release New Report

The joint research project, Shared Responsibility: U.S.-Mexico Policy Options for Confronting Organized Crime, concludes that binational efforts to stop organized crime in Mexico have made progress but need expanded cooperation to address the challenge.

Mexico Institute in the News: Eurozone crisis to cast shadow over G-20 summit

Obama’s visit to Los Cabos comes less than two weeks before Mexico’s presidential election, giving him one last sit-down with President Felipe Calderon, a counterpart with whom he’s developed a good relationship. Andrew Selee, Vice President for Programs and Senior Advisor of the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars comments.

Call for Entries: 2012 Awards for U.S.-Mexico Cross-Border Cooperation and Innovation

The Border Research Partnership announces its 2012 Awards for U.S.-Mexico Crossborder Collaboration and Innovation. The awards will honor bi-national collaboration and innovation in public safety, transportation planning, environmental stewardship, education, health, and the arts, among other fields.

Alfredo Corchado On the Capture of "40" the Leader of the Zetas Drug Cartel

“This guy has defined the decade,” Alfredo Corchado told the Wilson Center. “He changed the dynamics of trafficking. He was a game changer. Communities have been silenced because of him.” Alfredo Corchado worked on his book "Midnight in Mexico: A Reporter's Journey Through a Country's Descent Into Darkness" while a Wilson Center public policy scholar in 2010.

Task Force Urges Joint U.S.-Mexico Approach to Border - Mexico Institute in the News

“Look at the example of drugs and weapons smuggling,” Wilson says. “There are drug demand issues on the U.S. side, but there are weapons demand issues on the Mexican side, where there are also rule-of-law issues and violence. The task force sought ways to share responsibility and work together to confront these interconnected problems.”

Part IV of the Latino Vote: A Look Ahead

In our final chapter, Roberto Suro looks beyond the headlines of 2012 to identify the most important trend lines reshaping the dynamics of U.S. elections.

Pages

Experts & Staff