Events

Mexico Institute in the News: Mexico's Presidential Election

Andrew Selee, Vice President for Programs and Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute, appeared on NPR’s “To the Point” with Warren Olney to talk about the upcoming Mexican elections.

Four Rule of Law Policies to Make Mexico Grow

In this article, Mexico scholar Viridiana Rios discusses the relationship between economic development and the rule of law. She argues that the rule of law provides a foundation for economic development by fostering a secure climate for investment, creating an environment of certainty about conflict resolution, providing all economic actors equal access to justice, and limiting corruption, predatory behavior and informality.

Mexico Institute in the News: Texas’ Economic Trailblazing with Mexico

Texas's economy is growing faster than the rest of the country because of its growing trade with Mexico.

Threading the Needle on Immigration Reform in the United States – The Expert Take

Is this finally the year that Congress reforms U.S. immigration policy and provides a path to citizenship for the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the country? It would seem so, given the various encouraging statements from Republican and Democratic leaders over the past week. The policy calculations seem favorable, too, with years of net-zero migration from Mexico and the prospect of reduced migration pressures in the future. However, what remains highly unpredictable is the political calculus on immigration, with dynamics at the national and local level potentially at odds with each other.

Educational cooperation and exchanges: An emerging issue

The Mexico Institute prepared a brief highlighting the potential for expanding student exchange and international mobility programs between the U.S. and Mexico.

Immigration and Security: Does the New Immigration Law Protect the People of Arizona?

On July 29, the first pieces of Arizona’s new immigration law, SB 1070, take effect without the most controversial parts of the legislation. The sections that mandated that Arizona police enforce federal immigration laws have been blocked by a federal judge pending further review.1 If fully implemented, the law would direct police to ascertain the immigration status of people they stop or detain while enforcing other laws, make it a state crime for immigrants to not have papers documenting legal status in their possession, and otherwise increase state pressure on unauthorized (some would say all) immigrants.

Can Mexico's President-elect Peña Nieto and Obama set a new tone? - Mexico Institute in the News

Eric Olson provides commentary on Mexico-US relations. This article also ran in Yahoo! News, AlaskaDispatch.com, OnePageNews.us, and other news outlets.

New Approaches to Migration Management in Mexico and Central America

Until recently, the outflow of Mexicans to the United States dominated the attention of Mexican politicians, policymakers, and migration researchers, but public attention has shifted in recent years to the phenomenon of transit migration. Over the past two decades, Mexico has increasingly become a destination for Central American migrants seeking to enter the United States; many remain in Mexico for extended periods and, in some cases, settle permanently.

Pages

EMAIL UPDATES

Upcoming Events

Experts & Staff