Events

Mexico Institute in the News: In Texas, Caution, Optimism Greet Mexican Election

Texas lawmakers are concerned that the PRI will revive its tainted past, which included reports of corruption and deal-making with criminal elements. In an overview of the race, Eric Olson, Associate Director of the Mexico Institute, said that the question on most people’s minds was whether Peña Nieto could overcome his party’s tainted legacy and “usher in a new era with a reformed PRI capable of tackling the issues of corruption and inefficient government, security and violence, and economic under-performance that have vexed other parties as well.”

Mexico Institute in the News: Mexico's Resilient Industrial Machine

U.S. manufacturers have success in Mexico even with problems such as the drug cartels. Mexico's GDP is expected to continue to grow.

Mexico: Taking down "The Teacher" - Mexico Institute in the News (Video)

Known as La Maestra or 'The Teacher', Gordillo headed the National Union of Education Workers or SNTE, which is estimated to have 1.5 million members. Christopher Wilson spoke to AlJazeera about her recent arrest.

Energy and Natural Resources

The latest Mexico Institute publications on Mexico’s energy reform debate, as well as opportunities for U.S.-Mexico cooperation on solar, wind and bioenergy projects.

Our Shared Border: Success Stories in U.S.-Mexico Collaboration

Our Shared Border highlights twelve success stories of cross-border collaboration and innovation between Mexico and the United Sates, offering a counter-narrative to frequent media portrayals of violence and poverty in the border region.

Part I of The Latino Vote: Election 2012 Results

Perhaps the biggest story to emerge from the 2012 election other than the actual results, is the potentially decisive role played by Latino American voters. In part one of our series, Tamar Jacoby, President of ImmigrationWorks USA, looks back at the recent outcome and its implications for the future.

Mexico Institute in the News: 5 Things You Didn't Know About Operation Fast and Furious

Andrew Selee, vice president for programs at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington D.C. says the Mexican government was aware of the gun-walking, in spite of releasing a statement saying they were not.

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