Events

Mexico's Energy Reform Drawing Interest in Texas - Mexico Institute in the News

“They are talking seriously about allowing private investment in the oil sector in general, [but] they want the state to retain control. So what that actually means in reality is very tough to work out,” he said. “Because retaining control could be legislative, regulatory; it could be the dominant player. No one is quite sure what that means.”

A New Beginning for Mexican Oil

Based on the collaborative work of a high‐level group of Mexican energy experts during the first half of 2012, this report focuses on the issues facing Mexico’s hydrocarbon sector and the most important principles that must underlie the forthcoming reform of the country’s oil and gas industry. Although multiple diagnoses of the sector exist, in recent years there has been no fundamental examination of the principles that should underlie the nation’s energy policy.

Woodrow Wilson Center Mexico Institute and the University of San Diego's Trans-Border Institute Release New Report

The joint research project, Shared Responsibility: U.S.-Mexico Policy Options for Confronting Organized Crime, concludes that binational efforts to stop organized crime in Mexico have made progress but need expanded cooperation to address the challenge.

Migration and Migrants

Publications include a 9-part series on Latino immigrant civic engagement, as well as papers exploring the legal side of Mexican migration and the relationship between migration and development.

Mexico’s Energy Reform: A Game Changer in the Nation’s History (An Upstream Perspective)

The Mexican energy reform bill adopted by a narrow margin on December 12, 2013 and which took effect on January 1, 2014 formalizes the most liberal energy regime in the country’s history.

Mexico Institute in the News: Elections results protests are shrinking in Mexico — here’s why

The second weekend of July, only 4,000 people attended a protest that was mostly spontaneous, and this weekend, a marcha that was organized by the #YoSoy132 student movement [and other social groups] and promoted as part of a new strategy to “resist” the “imposition” of PRI candidate Enrique Peña Nieto, only garnered some 30,000 people. Does this mean that the #YoSoy132 student movement and the rest of the “anti-imposition” crowd is losing support?.. The Mexico Institute's Eric Olson comments.

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