Events

Napolitano: Immigration hasn’t been ‘a linchpin, red hot issue’ in 2012 - Mexico Institute in the News

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and Mexican Secretary of Interior Alejandro Poiré spoke about U.S. – Mexico collaboration in tackling illegal immigration across the U.S.-Mexico border and drug and human trafficking at the Woodrow Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute on Monday.

Is Geography Destiny? A Primer on North American Relations

At a time when nearly all of the key issues facing North America are being understood and addressed either independently by the United States, Canada and Mexico, or within the dual-bilateral framework of U.S.-Mexico and U.S.-Canada relations, this report attempts to view these challenges and opportunities through a trilateral lens.

Mexico Institute in the News: Mexico election: Economy matters as much as security

As Mexico's presidential race enters its home stretch towards the vote on 1 July, the issue of drug-related violence has not, as widely expected, dominated the campaign. The Mexico Institute's Duncan Wood explains how the economy is as important as security.

A Review of "My Country: Insights to Understand and Change Mexico"

Eric L. Olson, Senior Associate at the Mexico institute, has reviewed Denise Dresser's book titled "My Country: Insights to Understand and Change Mexico". The review appears on page 10 of the recent issue of 'Americas Quarterly' for winter the of 2012.

The Effects of Drug-War Related Violence on Mexico’s Press and Democracy

This paper offers an assessment of the impact of criminal violence on journalists and media workers in Mexico, which is now the most dangerous country in the Western Hemisphere for journalists. Dr. Edmonds-Poli concludes with a set of policy recommendations for the Mexican government, Mexican society, and the international community to address the problem of violence against the Mexican media.

Steady Advances, Slow Results: U.S.-Mexico Security Cooperation After Two Years of the Obama Administration

In this paper we look at what the two governments have done over the past two years to move forward on their commitments. We find that there have been steady advances in each of the areas they committed to address, but that the results so far are far less than what is needed to address the threat posed by organized crime groups.

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