Events

Education on the U.S.-Mexico Agenda? - Mexico Institute in the News (In Spanish)

A higher education initiative between the U.S.- Mexico governments can improve the relationship between the two countries. By creating a bilateral program that can facilitate the exchange of top students and professors from both countries, Mexican students could benefit from prestigious math and science programs in the United States, while American students could benefit from recognized language and cultural programs in Mexico. In the long run, this initiative could create a generation of more competitive professionals in both countries.

Winners of Journalism Fellowship Announced

We are pleased to announce this year's group of winners of the 2009 Woodrow Wilson Center-Washington Post Fellowship for Latin American Journalists. The fellowship provides an opportunity to conduct three weeks of reporting concerning hemispheric relations on an issue of importance to journalists' home countries, and works as an immersion program in the political culture of the U.S. capital.

US Immigration Policy and Mexican/Central American Migration Flows: Then and Now

Young, low-skilled immigrants perform essential work, but the rapid growth of low-wage, limited English proficient (LEP), unauthorized populations in states with limited migration experience has contributed to increased anti-immigrant sentiment. Forty years into the current wave of regional migration, and after 25 years of increasingly serious enforcement efforts, this history also defines and limits the policy alternatives available, and highlights the challenges of managing regional flows.

Mexico Reacts to Approval of Marijuana Ballot Measures-Mexico Institute in the News

Eric Olson, deputy director of the Mexico Institute at the Wilson Center, said that revenue from marijuana comprises about 20 percent of cartels’ total revenue.

Mexico’s anti-drug strategy upside down after Colorado legalizes marijuana-Mexico Institute in the News

“There is a sense of frustration throughout Latin America about the steep costs of confronting drug trafficking. And these votes in the United States, and the reaction to them, might signal a willingness for the countries to think outside of the box on drug policy,” said Eric Olson, associate director of the Mexico Institute at the Wilson Center in Washington

Mexico Institute in the News: Troubles Vex Mexico Crime-Fighting Force

The Federal Police was supposed to be this country's answer to the FBI—a tough investigative and crime-fighting force. But when Federal Police officers allegedly tried to kill two U.S. government employees outside this hillside village last month, doubts surfaced on both sides of the border about whether the agency can be trusted to lead Mexico's charge against organized crime. The Mexico Institute's Eric L. Olson comments.

Wilson Center Mourns Passing of Don Lorenzo Zambrano, CEO of CEMEX

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is saddened to learn of the passing of Don Lorenzo Zambrano, CEO of CEMEX. Don Lorenzo was one of the founding Members of the Advisory Board of the Woodrow Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute and the recipient of the Woodrow Wilson Award.

Mexico Institute in the News: In Texas, Caution, Optimism Greet Mexican Election

Texas lawmakers are concerned that the PRI will revive its tainted past, which included reports of corruption and deal-making with criminal elements. In an overview of the race, Eric Olson, Associate Director of the Mexico Institute, said that the question on most people’s minds was whether Peña Nieto could overcome his party’s tainted legacy and “usher in a new era with a reformed PRI capable of tackling the issues of corruption and inefficient government, security and violence, and economic under-performance that have vexed other parties as well.”

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