Events

Subsidizing Inequality: Mexican Corn Policy Since NAFTA

Subsidizing Inequality: Mexican Corn Policy Since NAFTA

This study on Mexican corn policy since NAFTA was made possible thanks to a grant from the Global Development Program of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and reflects collaboration between the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars’ Mexico Institute, the University of California, Santa Cruz and researchers from CIDE, the Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas.

Mexican Oil and Gas: Christmas Arrives Early

The Mexico Institute has partnered with Forbes.com, and will post directly to the Forbes website as a trusted contributor. In this piece, Director Duncan Wood predicts that 2014 will bring changes to the energy industry in the form of a radically different oil and gas sector in Mexico, one that is ripe with opportunity.

Noticias Winter 2004 available for download

Articles on Conflict and Peace in Colombia, Analyzing Citizenship, MERCOSUR, Mexican & US Journalists Seminar, Changes in Cuban Society, Hemispheric Security, Combatting Child Labor in Brazil and more! Download the .pdf from our Noticias publications page.

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto’s first six months: a conversation with Duncan Wood - Mexico Institute in the News

Mexico Institute Director Duncan Wood comments on Peña Nieto's first six months in office and the evolving security situation in Mexico.

Mexico Institute in the News: Mexican, U.S. relations improve in fight against drugs, trafficking

Andrew Selee, vice president for programs at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington D.C. is comments on the nature of the relationship during a luncheon with Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and Mexican Interios Secretary Alejandro Poire.

Mexico Institute in the News: Mexico’s Telenovela President: Enrique Peña Nieto’s Saga of Scandal, Gaffes, and Connections

The personal life of Mexico's next president, Enrique Peña Nieto, reads like a telenovela script. It could be called "Because you know me," which was his campaign slogan, as the personal affairs of Mexico's next president have become public...The Mexico Institute's Eric Olson comments.

The Development and Fiscal Effects of Emigration on Mexico

The two most important ways that migration influences development in Mexico is through remittances and labor markets. Mexico is the largest recipient of remittances in Latin America, with remittances totaling $22 billion (about 2.5% of GDP) in 2010. Focusing on labor markets, existing research suggests that between 1990 and 2000 migration increased wages by 8% in Mexico with more pronounced effects among less-educated workers.

The life of the "Young and Undocumented" - Mexico Institute in the News (In Spanish)

Miguel Salazar, Public Affairs Specialist at the Mexico Institute spoke to Voz de America following the event, "Young and Undocumented: The New American Story."

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