Events

In the Lurch Between Government and Chaos: Unconsolidated Democracy in Mexico

To move forward, reforms must be ambitious. Simply reforming one institution in a sea of lawlessness leads nowhere; there must be a wide-ranging transformation of the political regime. Mexico's challenge is therefore to build modern, competent democratic institutions that are capable of engaging in good governance - only then will they be able to expand economic opportunity and restore economic growth.

Poiré y Napolitano - Mexico Institute in the News

This article was originally written in Spanish. The Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC, hosted a dialogue between Janet Napolitano, secretary of U.S. Homeland Security, and Alejandro Poire, Interior Minister, on the eve of a binational review of the Merida Initiative.

La calidad de ciudadano. Past and Present.

The Nature of Citizenship in Mexico and the United States: 1776-1912

Harper Visas

Few decisions have received as much condemnation as the establishment by the Canadian government of visas for Mexicans. This requirement was initiated in July 2009 by decision of Prime Minister Stephen Harper, from the Conservative Party and in that position since February 2006. In addition, the procedure for obtaining them is absurd, unnecessarily complex, and demeaning.

Mexico Institute in the News: The North American Market: A Competitive Edge That Shouldn’t Be Squandered

If there’s a golden rule for economic competitiveness, it’s this: “Always exploit your advantages.” Yet for more than a decade, the United States has systematically undermined one of its biggest – our proximity to a wealthy, resource-rich partner to the north and a developing, labor-rich partner to the south..."The State of Trade, Competitiveness and Economic Well-being in the U.S.-Mexico Border Region" by the Mexico Institute's Christopher Wilson is used to explain the U.S. economic relationship with Mexico.

Overview of the Merida Initiative

The Merida Initiative, which has been proposed by the U.S. and Mexican governments, would provide $1.4 billion over three years in equipment and training from the U.S. to the Mexican government to support both law enforcement efforts directed against organized crime and long-term institution building for federal police and the judicial system.

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