Events

Mexico Institute in the News: Science at stake in Mexican election

For much of the twentieth century, Mexico was considered to be the leader in Latin American science. Yet although the country still has pockets of research excellence, Mexico's GERD per GDP now ranks among the very lowest in the world's top 40 economies. Andrew Selee, Vice President for Programs and Senior Advisor to the Mexico Institute, comments.

Testimony before the Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere: NAFTA at Twenty - Accomplishments, Challenges, and the Way Forward

Mexico Institute Director Duncan Wood offered his testimony regarding the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) at a hearing before the Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere. In his testimony, he addressed what the goal of the agreement was when it was negotiated, what the potential of the region is today, and what is missing to fully realize the potential of today’s North America.

Today We March, Tomorrow We Vote: Latino Migrant Civic Engagement in L.A.

This report is part of a series on Latin American immigrant civic and political participation that looks at eight cities around the United States: Charlotte, NC; Chicago, IL; Fresno, CA; Las Vegas, NV; Los Angeles, CA; Omaha, NE; Tucson, AZ; and Washington, DC. The reports on each city describe the opportunities and barriers that Latino immigrants face in participating as civic and political actors in cities around the United States.

Think Tank Urges “More Ambitious” U.S.-Mexican Agenda - Mexico Institute in the News

“There is an enormous amount of optimism right now in the bilateral relationship, and the reason of that is because there’s an idea that this is a new beginning,” said Duncan Wood, co-author of the Wilson Center report, entitled “New Ideas for a New Era”.

The human toll of Mexico’s drug war -Mexico Institute in the News

Eric Olson talks about how the U.S. and Mexico are waging the drug war, and the overall toll of the crisis for “The Situation Room.”

Evolving Demographic and Human-Capital Trends in Mexico and Central America and Their Implications For Regional Migration

As the US labor force became better educated, fewer native workers accepted many of the low-wage but essential jobs at the bottom of the labor market. These changes in the United States coincided with a population boom in Mexico and Central America that resulted in a near tripling of the region's population. Economic growth was unable to keep pace with demographic change, however, and many of the region's youth sought opportunities in the United States.

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