Events

Is It Possible to Negotiate With Iran?

For the last 30 years, the United States and Iran largely have remained estranged from each other, but the Obama administration has expressed interest in a dialogue with Iran. Two recent Middle East Program events explored whether negotiation is possible in the current atmosphere.

The United States Must Advance a Mideast Policy Based on Collaboration

"The goal [of U.S. Middle East policy] is a strategy shaped together with the Middle Eastern world: leaders and peoples alike, borrowing the best impulses of the bottom-up Arab Spring and the traditionally top-down U.S. approach to engagement. Our promise to the Middle East must be one in which collaboration helps the people of the region achieve shared values by a route of their own choice," writes Jane Harman in The Washington Post.

Negotiating With Iran Part 1: Switzerland's Protecting Power Mandate

Iran's nuclear program continues to move forward. Israel and the United States have declared a nuclear Iran unacceptable. Negotiations have stalled while sanctions appear to be taking a toll on the Islamic Republic's economy. How will the standoff be resolved? Is a diplomatic solution possible or is a military confrontation inevitable? To gain insight into the possibility for diplomacy to prevail, we spoke with two veteran Iran experts with decades of direct experience in the diplomatic arena. First up is the Swiss Ambassador to the Islamic Republic. Because of Switzerland's role as "protective power" of the U.S. in Iran, Livia Leu Agosti has served as the diplomatic liaison between the countries since 2009.

Morocco's Arab Spring

By David B. Ottaway, Senior Scholar, Woodrow Wilson Center and former Bureau Chief, Washington Post, Cairo

Who Won the Gaza War?

Who is winning the war in Gaza? Aaron David Miller writes that while it's still too early to say, for now, here's how he would score the performance of the five major parties to this crisis: Israel, Hamas, the PA, Egypt, and the United States.

Bibi Trapped

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu faces the prospect of being ensnared in traps that will limit his room to maneuver and undermine Israel's interests, writes Aaron David Miller.

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Experts & Staff