Events

"Quran burning in Kabul? What it's like for an expat in Afghanistan"

During a lockdown, if you try to walk across the street to buy bread, your compound guards will not only deny you exit, they’ll reprimand you for being outside at all. It's all part of living in Kabul, former Wilson Center research assistant Matt Trevithick writes.

American Policy in the Maghreb: Counterterrorism is Not Enough

U.S. policy toward the Maghreb countries is presently driven above all by security concerns. Although three of the four countries—Morocco, Tunisia, and Libya—have experienced considerable political change since 2011 and Algeria is on the verge of a succession crisis with potentially significant consequences, the United States is not deeply involved in these transitions. Exhausted and disappointed by failed nation-building efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan, the United States seems to be moving toward the opposite extreme, neglecting political transformations to focus on security. Unless the countries restore or maintain political stability, however, counterterrorism efforts cannot succeed

Reports from Tehran Indicate that Haleh Esfandiari Has Been Formally Charged with Espionage and Endangering Iranian Security

"We are extremely disheartened to receive this news," said Lee H. Hamilton, president and director of the Woodrow Wilson Center. "Haleh is a scholar. The work she does at the Wilson Center is open, non-partisan, and includes a broad range of views. At the Wilson Center, we do not take positions on issues, but rather, we bring all sides of an issue together for dialogue."

Has the Arab Spring Produced a Chasm between the Revolutionary and Status Quo Countries in the Arab World?

While some experts predicted that the Arab rebellions of spring 2011 (and beyond) would widen the strategic, political, and even ideological gap between Arab states undergoing dramatic change and those defending the status quo, in fact, no such clear breach has occurred. Instead, Dawisha argues that economic crisis, escalating Shi’i-Sunni tensions, and the associated realpolitik concerns of the Western powers have dampened the potentially incendiary demonstration effect of Arab political revolts on the course of both domestic political change and regional politics.

Women’s Rights Under Egypt’s Constitutional Disarray

Egypt’s post-revolution constitution does not explicitly prohibit discrimination based on gender or religion. It only recognizes women’s domestic role within a family “founded on religion, morality, and patriotism.” Clerics will have the final word over the new laws.

IAEA Chief Cites Modest Iran Nuclear Progress; Official Report Due

Public Policy Scholar Michael Adler interviewed IAEA Chief Yukiya Amano and reports in Breaking Defense that Iran’s recent slow down on its nuclear program could signal a readiness to create favorable conditions for a deal with the U.S.

The Nuclear Issue: Why is Iran Negotiating?

After several months of uncertainty, the Iranian government finally agreed to meet again with the P5+1 group in Almaty, Kazakhstan on February 26 for negotiations over its nuclear program. Iran’s economy is suffering the effects of the severe sanctions imposed by the West, but the government is not yet prepared to change course on the nuclear issue. Iran needs to be certain of a positive outcome from the negotiations before it commits itself to meeting the West’s concerns over its nuclear intentions.

Robin Wright’s book Rock the Casbah wins OPC Award

USIP-Wilson Center Distinguished Scholar Robin Wright’s book Rock the Casbah has won the Cornelius Ryan Award for best non-fiction book on international affairs.

Middle East Program 2013 Year in Review

In 2013, the Middle East Program at the Woodrow Wilson Center produced 44 publications and 63 meetings. The summary of all of our activities is in the attachment below.

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