Events

Reformist Women Thinkers in Islamic Societies

What place does gender reform have in modern Islamic societies? A May 4 conference sponsored by the Middle East Program examined the efforts of reformist women to improve the status of women throughout the region.

Iran's Offer to Talk About Its Nuclear Program Eases Tension For Now

“Iran showed this week that it has a policy every bit as dual track as the one the United States is pursuing against it,” writes Public Policy Scholar Michael Adler. “In a dramatic gesture, Iran stepped away from warnings of military retaliation to offer talks on a nuclear program Washington fears could lead to the bomb for the Islamic Republic.”

Can International Human Rights Norms Secure Women’s Rights in the MENA Region? (Fall 2013)

This publication is the outcome of the July 10, 2013 conference of the same name co-sponsored by the Middle East Program, Global Women’s Leadership Initiative, Environmental Change and Security Program, and Global Health Initiative. Women leaders and activists from the Middle East write about the current women’s rights situation on the ground in the region and what strategies can be employed to use international human rights norms to secure their rights going forward.

An Assesment of the Iranian Presidential Elections

The Middle East Project at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars arranged a series of meetings on June 25 and 26, 2001, to assess the June 9 presidential elections in Iran. A number of Iranian specialists from Iran and the U.S. took part in the sessions. This publication brings together the papers presented at these meetings.
Child Targets in Syria

Child Targets in Syria

Distinguished Scholar Robin Wright talks with BBC World News America about new allegations by the UN High Commission on Human Rights that the Syrian military have been targeting children.

A Third Iraq War?

"Given its deepening sectarian and ethnic divisions—and the absence of a cohesive or effective military—the modern Iraqi state may not hold," writes Robin Wright.

As Islamists stumble in Egypt and Tunisia, the Arab Spring turns wintery

Of all the states that rose against tyranny, Egypt and Tunisia have traveled the furthest on the road to democratic transformation. However, concerns about the Islamists’ fidelity to democracy continue to mount. This is particularly so in Egypt where the president seems susceptible to authoritarian proclivities and the Islamist elite show little inclination to compromise. In Tunisia, the prospects for democracy are relatively better as Ennahda, partners in the governing coalition, have little choice but to be flexible. It is rather ironic that democratic transformation is left in the hands of those professing fidelity to principles whose compatibility with democracy is contested.

Pages

Experts & Staff