Events

Reports from Tehran Indicate that Haleh Esfandiari Has Been Formally Charged with Espionage and Endangering Iranian Security

"We are extremely disheartened to receive this news," said Lee H. Hamilton, president and director of the Woodrow Wilson Center. "Haleh is a scholar. The work she does at the Wilson Center is open, non-partisan, and includes a broad range of views. At the Wilson Center, we do not take positions on issues, but rather, we bring all sides of an issue together for dialogue."

Why Obama Won’t Give (or Get) Much in Saudi Arabia

"Key linkages—billions in recent U.S. weapons sales, counter-terrorism cooperation, and all that oil—will keep Riyadh and Washington together for some time to come, whether each side, deep down, really likes it or not," writes Aaron David Miller.

A New Beginning and a New Regional Office Paving the Way for a New Model for Human Rights in Egypt

Former Wilson Center public policy scholar Moushira Khattab on Egypt's decision to offer to host a regional office for the United Nations High Commission on Human Rights (OHCHR).

Syria Action Group Plan May Only Add to Muddle

Distinguished Scholar Aaron David Miller writes that right now, the conflict in Syria is less amenable to outside intervention than at any point since it began, precisely because it’s owned — as only a struggle for survival can be — by the parties waging it, not by the members of the Action Group on Syria.

Morocco: “Advanced Decentralization” Meets the Sahara Autonomy Initiative

The pace of reform in Morocco has been extremely slow since the enacting of the new constitution. Yet, buried in the maze of reports and studies that accompany any change in Morocco, a significant development is taking place: the program of “advanced regionalization” promoted by the king is transforming the 2007 proposal to grant a degree of autonomy to the Western Sahara into a one-size-fits-all system in which all Moroccan regions would enjoy more self-government, with the Western Sahara treated like any other region.

In 2013, Rise of the Right in Elections Across the Mideast

In 2013, millions of Israelis, Iranians, and Arabs will vote in at least 10 pivotal elections that will, in turn, address basic issues facing the Middle East. These countries have vast political, religious, ethnic, and economic differences. But most confront a common trend—the rise of the right or the religious right—that will influence elections as well as policies both at home and in the broader region.

How the Kurds Got Their Way

Iraqi Kurdistan has achieved new prosperity by exporting its own oil and gas to Turkey, against the objections of Iraq’s central government. By challenging Baghdad’s claims to exclusive control of Iraq’s natural resources, the Kurds are showing how economic cooperation can make Middle Eastern borders more porous.

The Case Against Negotiating With Assad

"U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is on a roll," writes Aaron David Miller. But, he cautions, negotiations with Assad would be a bad move.

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