Events

Violence Unsettles Tunisia’s Democratic Transition

Tunisia’s transition to democracy, widely regarded as the most successful to emerge from the five uprisings that shook the Arab world in 2011, is being seriously threatened by violence in the wake of a prominent leftist politician’s assassination in early February. The killing of Chokri Belaid has not only triggered a showdown within the ruling Islamic Ennahda Party between its moderate and fundamentalist wings but also deepened the hostility between secularists and Islamists within Tunisian society.

An Assessment of the Iranian Presidential Elections

Click to see the table of contents, or download the full PDF below.
Camp David

How Not to Host a Summit

The 2000 peace talks at Camp David offer three key lessons on how not to solve the world's most intractable conflict, writes Distinguished Scholar Aaron David Miller in Foreign Policy magazine.

Negotiating With Iran Part 2: A Matter of Trust

Iran's nuclear program continues to move forward. Israel and the United States have declared a nuclear Iran unacceptable. Negotiations have stalled while sanctions appear to be taking a toll on the Islamic Republic's economy. How will the standoff be resolved? Is a diplomatic solution possible or is a military confrontation inevitable? To gain insight into the possibility for diplomacy to prevail, we spoke with two veteran Iran experts with decades of direct experience in the diplomatic arena. John Limbert, one of the 52 Americans held hostage for 444 days from November 4, 1979, to January 20, 1981, shares his unique perspective on U.S.-Iran relations.

Giving Birth to a New Nation: Women Leaders Discuss their Role in Reconstructing Iraq

Eight Iraqi women, including the two female members of the Iraqi Governing Council, recently met at the Wilson Center to discuss reconstruction and the role of women in formal and informal governance structures in Iraq.

Obama Will Bomb Syria

"Obama will act militarily in Syria, but deliberately. Whatever its misgivings, the U.S. military will execute whatever attack the president authorizes – maybe missile strikes against units that have used chemical weapons, or against other military infrastructure. And if he explains his reasoning clearly and transparently, he’ll have Congress and the public behind him," writes Aaron David Miller in Politico.

The United States Must Advance a Mideast Policy Based on Collaboration

"The goal [of U.S. Middle East policy] is a strategy shaped together with the Middle Eastern world: leaders and peoples alike, borrowing the best impulses of the bottom-up Arab Spring and the traditionally top-down U.S. approach to engagement. Our promise to the Middle East must be one in which collaboration helps the people of the region achieve shared values by a route of their own choice," writes Jane Harman in The Washington Post.

Pages

Experts & Staff