Events

J. Christopher Stevens, 1960-2012

"He represented the very best of American diplomacy. He knew the streets, not just the elites. He had an infectious enthusiasm about the extraordinary history playing out across the Middle East, which he witnessed up close," said Distinguished Scholar Robin Wright on her friend of 25 years, Ambassador Christopher Stevens.

Iraq Needs to Stop Trying to Make 'Inclusive' Happen

“Overcoming sectarian divisions won’t solve Iraq’s crisis. Embracing them will,” writes Marina Ottaway.

Exile of Assad Family A Key First Step in Political Transition

With a Tuesday ceasefire date in doubt and allegations continuing to swirl of military atrocities, it is becoming clearer that the first step of Syria’s political transition should be the removal of President Bashar al-Assad and his family, Wilson Center Director Jane Harman tells MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell.

Democrats Divided on Iran Sanctions

Jane Harman appeared on MSNBC's "The Daily Rundown" with Time magazine's world editor Bobby Ghosh to discuss the Iran sanctions bill and Russia's oil-for-goods negotiations with Iran. "We've spent 10 years imposing sanctions to get to the point where we can talk to Iran, so let's talk to Iran," Harman said.

Chemical Weapons Use in Syria

“I think urging the U.N. immediately to investigate this is right action number one and then, two, mobilizing the entire world community. If there was a massive use of chemical weapons, that should be a rallying cry for the world to get involved,” said Jane Harman on Andrea Mitchell Reports.

The Future of Syria

"This is not just a Syria problem, this is a world problem. I think we have reached the tipping point. This opposition or what is good about it…has got to get more support from the United States and it has to be known that we are helping,” said Jane Harman on MSNBC's Morning Joe.

The Uncertain Fate of U.S.-Egyptian Relations

Ottaway, who has just visited Cairo, writes about the future U.S.-Egyptian relationship in light of the current political drift between the two countries and Egypt’s ongoing economic crisis. Egypt’s current attempt to secure a $4.8 billion IMF loan requiring potential subsidy cuts to gasoline and cooking oil serve to complicate matters as ensuing price rises could trigger riots and provoke Egyptians to blame the United States.

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Experts & Staff